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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephanie Brim View Post
    That's too new for me. I prefer the rendering of older lenses. I'll save high contrast for 35mm and medium format.

    I'll be keeping my eye out for more rapid rectilinear types. Uncoated, probably. I'm weird that way.


    hey steph

    i am not sure if you plan on shooting paper or film.
    i lean towards paper for my 8x10 and bigger cause my kids
    ate all the money i would have spent on film ... and i don't mind
    long exposures ortho type grey rendering &c.
    you mention older lenses ... you might consider one of reinhold's wollaston lenses !
    he makes them big and small and from all reports they are a thing of beauty. ( he is a apug member ! )
    the lenses come with waterhouse stops so you can stop down and get a sharp image if you want
    or you can shoot wide open and get fun soft exposures. he also makes an adapter for a packard shutter
    if you need an instantaneous exposure and he is developing a drop / guillotine shutter as well.

    http://re-inventedphotoequip.com/Site/Home.html

    not expensive but ... gold

    good luck !
    john
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

    website
    blog
    sell-site

  2. #32
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Dec 2006
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    Humboldt Co.
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    8x10 Format
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    If you happen across an Ansco 8x10, let me know. I might have a 5x7 Ansco reducing back for it -- a slider. It does a 5x7, or you can take two 3.25x5's on a sheet of 5x7.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    el paso ---texas
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    ULarge Format
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    I am suggesting an alternative to regular tripods. I solved that problem because my hobby is making mammoth wooden cameras, bellows and filmholders that exceed 50 lbs by using a 4pod. That is a 24x32 1 inch thick marine plywood cut board with 2 heavy duty telescopeing tripod legs on the front and 2 at the back. I call it a 4 pod and it will support my weight also

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by takermaker View Post
    I am suggesting an alternative to regular tripods. I solved that problem because my hobby is making mammoth wooden cameras, bellows and filmholders that exceed 50 lbs by using a 4pod. That is a 24x32 1 inch thick marine plywood cut board with 2 heavy duty telescopeing tripod legs on the front and 2 at the back. I call it a 4 pod and it will support my weight also

    Pictures? It would be fun to see the cameras too.

  5. #35
    athanasius80's Avatar
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    Dec 2004
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    Huntington Beach, California
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    Another vote against the Korona, beautiful camera, but every 5x7 Korona I had was sorta wobbly, and my 8x10 Korona was positively flappy until I reglued part of the front standard and all the rails. Most people's accounts seem to prefer Eastman 2Ds and the Ansco/Agfa-Ansco stuff. Good luck Steph! 8x10 is awesome.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Hertfordshire England
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    35mm RF
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    11
    Hi Steph,

    Re. the Gundlach you were watching on ebay..

    I have had these in 5x4, 5x7, 5x12 and 8x20. Of all the cameras I have owned over the years, they are all without doubt the flimsiest.

    Usually the bent brass slides for the focussing just run in grooves in the wooden rails (an early one was brass lined) which together with bellows made of rhino skin make them "interesting" to work with. I think they were well designed and made for doing a specific job in the first few decades of the 20th century, but considering their age now, would not recommend them for everyday use: just as something nice for a change.

    The Agfa and Ansco's on the other hand have always been solid, as well as the Kodaks. The latter were made here in the UK under licence by Kodak England. The only 10x8 I now have is the All Metal Kodak Commercial View which is magnesium alloy, but still has rhino bellows!

    Also I have a tailboard camera in whole plate. Something like this would be fine for portraits. There is rising and cross front, and a bit of tilt on the back, but it is light and folds up pretty small - the tailboard protects the GG. Also, having a fixed front standard it can take quite a heavy lens. I use it for wetplate. It is pretty rigid and strong despite being about 110 years old.

    Susie

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    MD
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    281
    I have an Ansco Field 5x7, sounds like you've ruled the 5x7 format out but it's a nice camera (what do I know, though). It is my first LF camera (besides a can w/ a hole in it) but the front standard seems a little wobbly.

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