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  1. #21
    Halka's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Christian View Post
    From 35mm to medium format is indeed a quantum leap in quality...
    So, the smallest possible jump?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    Starting out with a cheap used monorail like a Cambo/Calumet is a good way to go. A monorail is straight forward and easy to learn movements on. They are awkward to backpack with but some people do it.

    If you later decide you want a press or field camera you can always sell the monorail for close to what you paid for it. Monorails do make great portrait and still life cameras and can compliment a press or field.
    Too bulky, too heavy. Exactly the kind of thing that ends up sitting on the shelf. However what I disagree with is that youll always be able to sell them. They almost have no-resale value as no one wants to lug them about (my camera shop got rid of a heap for scrap metal value).

    Time for some LF pin-ups;

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs View Post
    However what I disagree with is that youll always be able to sell them. They almost have no-resale value as no one wants to lug them about (my camera shop got rid of a heap for scrap metal value).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I'm sorry to hear that. They do still sell on the used market in the United States. Most of them sell cheap though unless it's a late model Arca Swiss, Linhof or Sinar.

  4. #24
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    Maybe go out with some large format shooters on a field trip. They would love to let you lug some stuff for them.

    Maybe buy 2 or so holders and 25 sheets of film and see if they will teach you on your film. Dev and print, then you will have a taste for it. After that you can spend away your paycheck on more and more stuff.

    Lee

  5. #25

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    My first 4x5 was a cambo monorail, its a great camera all around. But I got bitten by the bug, no I have 5 of them. 2 more 4x5's and 2 5x7's

    I don't use the Cambo anymore, been thinking of selling it.

  6. #26

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    Some interesting points. I never really considered going out with a group, I tend to be a pretty solitary shooter. I work very weird hours so it's difficult coordinating with people. My aim is going to be to try one of these out. I live in Los Angeles so there is no shortage of places that rent out LF gear, and I'm sure there are a few shooters around here. I know Sammy's rents some LF cameras and lenses so maybe I'll try that out to get a feel for it.

    One of the things I try to do is that I make sure I want something before I start, and when I do I try to do it right. I prefer to buy a high quality system that is rugged and has room for me to learn and grow vs one that I will want to replace. So a couple of the cameras I've been eyeing the Camonix 45N-2...but that Tachihara sure does look beautiful. But like I said this is not a purchase that will be happening anytime soon

  7. #27

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    If you buy a Tachi just be prepared for people to approach you and ask if you did the restoration on the beautiful antique camera yourself!

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    If you buy a Tachi just be prepared for people to approach you and ask if you did the restoration on the beautiful antique camera yourself!
    Haha that's just what I need...more attention. That might actually be a reason I don't get that camera, though I don't know how inconspicuous any LF system would be.

  9. #29
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    8X10 isn't necessarily exponentially more expensive than 4X5. It is more expensive, yes, but with 4X5 you will need a large, heavy, bulky enlarger to get prints larger than 4X5. With 8X10, you can make contact prints with simple equipment.

    My first large format camera, not counting an ancient Ansco 3A folder, was 8X10, and I never regretted starting out with the larger size. If you shop carefully, you can get a usable 8X10 camera for about twice the price, or a little less, of a decent 4X5. Also, if you shop carefully, you can get a usable 8X10 lens for a bit less than twice the price of a good 4X5 lens. And you don't have to look for an enlarger.

    8X10 film is about 4 times as expensive as 4X5 film, but you can make negatives on printing paper, ortho litho film, and X-ray film at much less cost. X-ray film, especially, is far less costly than 4X5 photographic film.

    You can get a used tripod with head that will handle 8X10 for not much more money than a good 4X5 tripod. Old Majestic tripods are considered good for this.

    I use an inexpensive contractor's tripod with a large, heavy wooden plank mounted on top that supports the entire bed of my ancient and not very rigid Improved Seneca View. Cheap and ugly, but I have no problems with unsharp negatives due to camera movement.
    Happiness is a load of bulk chemicals, a handful of recipes, a brick of film and a box of paper. - desertrat

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