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  1. #11

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    Any modern lens is going to give you good color rendition. I wish you had posted a shot from the pentax so we might be able to see the two side by side. You seem to like the subdued colors of over cast days and really any modern lens will give you that. I really do not see any difference between my schneider, rodenstock, or fuji lenses in color rendition under these conditions.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  2. #12
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    I think the Chamonix 45N2 is a great bargain for a first camera. Plenty of bellows extension and movements. And it sets up rigid. As far as lens I really like the Rodenstock 135mm Sironar S. I also own two other Rodenstocks and a pile of Nikons. I just got a Schneider Super Symar XL 110mm, but I haven't shot any color film with it. But so far I don't see much difference between the Nikons and Rodenstocks. Of course I have never noticed much difference in color between these LF lenses and the Mamiya 7 lenses either when I have shot both at about the same time.

    I shoot color negative film mostly so I suspect the minor differences in the lenses are lost during the printing or scanning phases.

    Based on your two sample shots I would say you should look at some older less contrasty lenses, but then you say you like the Mamiya 7 which has fairly contrasty lenses. So I really don't know how to advise you except to tell you to buy a few at good prices on ebay, and sell the ones you don't like as much. I imagine it won't cost you much and you may even make a profit if you are careful.

  3. #13

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    FWIW, if you decide to go with 210 a good complement would be a 120.

    The color rendition inconsistency is only true if you're shooting chromes. The variations in C41 processing/storage/damage in shipping pretty negates any minor differences between manufacturers.

    I ALWAYS carry my zircon encrusted tweezers on my hip when I'm near Montana.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  4. #14

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    thalmann.com is your friend:

    An extract:

    240 mm:
    At this point, forget the standard f5.6 plasmats. They are all in massive Copal #3 shutters, and weigh at least 780g. In this focal length, the Rodenstock 240mm f9 APO Ronar and Schneider 240mm f9 G Claron both come in Copal #1 shutters and are reasonably small and light. However, the smallest, lightest lens in the 240mm focal length is the:
    240mm f9 Fujinon A: Like the 200mm f8 Nikkor M, the 240mm Fujinon A is the only lens in it's class that comes in a Copal #0 shutter (See Figure 3. above). In fact, it is the longest non-telephoto focal length to ever be offered in a #0 shutter. That keeps the weight down to a very respectable 245g. The 240mm f9 Fujinon A is a so-called process lens (like the 150mm G Claron and 180mm Fujinon A above). So, performance at close distances is outstanding, but I have also found this lens to be remarkably sharp for more distant subjects (see Table 7.). The filter size is 52mm and the image circle, a very generous 336mm (enough to cover 8x10, and way more than necessary for 4x5 field use). I don't find the f9 maximum aperture to be a detriment in this focal length. The image on the ground glass just seems to snap right into focus. Like the 180mm Fujinon A above, this lens was made from the 1970s until it was discontinued in 1998. Early samples may be single coated. The one we tested was a late EBC multi-coated version from 1998.

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