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  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    So a couple thoughts.

    First is that you'll probably be in the 150mm to 210mm range for focal length to get close to the same angle of view.

    Second the maximum aperture on the lens will probably be marked as somewhere close to f/5.6. Bellows draw as you move in close reduces effective aperture so maybe 5.6 & 1/3 to 5.6 & 1/2.

    That puts you around 1/10th for speed. That's not the whole story though.

    You need to test your film in real terms with a real live subject just like your example. 3 shots done at EI 400,800,1600 with the film you intend to use. If you find that you can shoot at 1600 and get the detail you need/want/like then you are back to 1/60thish. If 800 works the 1/30th.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12

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    I'd recommend that the OP use studio flash. You really need at least f/16 to get reasonable DOF with lenses that are 200mm and up.

  3. #13

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    hi paul

    you can shoot handheld, and have the image right side up use available light ...
    use / shoot faster films and stop down ... too

    look for a graflex slr or any of the slr type large format cameras ( they made them upto 5x7, and even a gowland TLR that is 8x10 )

    you can put the camera on a tripod and view the glass with a dark cloth, or through the hood.
    the graflex slrs are the most versatile large format portrait cameras made ...
    i've had and used one for almost 20 years, and it is probably my favorite large camera to use .. portable too ...

    good luck !
    john

    ps. nice portrait !

  4. #14

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    Put it this way ... some of the best portrait work ever done utilized big view camera and lenses far
    more primitive than what has since been made. Look at the damn auction prices, and what some
    folks are willing to spend on a classic 1920's portrait lens without even a shutter, for example. I've
    found that subjects are more cooperative, whether in studio or in enviro portraiture settings, if they
    know it's serious. In other words, a big 8x10, darkcloth, and groundglass image actually helps. But
    as insurance, I made it a habit of keeping either a MF or Nikon with a long portrait lens nearby,
    just in case.

  5. #15

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    There is always the old style subject head clamps used way back when.
    Bob

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob-D659 View Post
    There is always the old style subject head clamps used way back when.
    The old school approach
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  7. #17
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    Use a leaf shutter with high speed flash sync. The Pentax 67 has the 165mm f4 leaf shutter lens (or the 90mm LS) for portraiture and high speed flash sync to 1/500. It's minimum focus though is 1.2m, so you're well back from the subject and able to control depth of focus satisfactorily. Film of 400 ISO would be a good choice.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  8. #18

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    People will generally hold still for a slow shutter speed. Dogs on the other hand do not always cooperate.

    Dave

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by 10speeduk View Post
    Thanks for the responses guys. I would prefer to view the ground glass. I shoot this shot indoor with window light with Iso 400 film at 1/60 with a 110mm lens at f2.8

    What would be the equivalent dof, lens and shutter speed to make this shot with a LF camera?

    Just approximately?

    Thanks for all the comments
    You can figure this out from the ratio of the film sizes, which is easy in this case because 6x7 (55x69mm) is basically the same aspect ratio as 4x5 film (95x115mm), and the ratio of the two sizes is about 115/69=1.66. If you're familiar with 6x7 and want to think about 4x5 options, keep that 1.66 number in mind for all your conversions.

    To get the same field of view, you need 110*1.66 = 180mm lens. And for the same DOF, f/(2.8*1.66) = f/4.5. And because of the smaller relative aperture, you need 1.66^2 = 2.8x (about 1.5 stops) more illumination, exposure time or sensitivity.

    f/4.5 lenses are not real common on 4x5 but they do exist, e.g. Xenars. Most people just cheap out and buy modern f/5.6 lenses and ignore that last half-stop - you won't be able to shoot in as low light as you can with the RZ; you will need 2 stops more light (f/5.6 vs f/2.8) than the RZ does. That's the tradeoff with bigger film.

    If you go to 8x10 that's a doubling, so it's 2 more stops of light required over what 4x5 needs.
    Last edited by polyglot; 12-05-2012 at 05:29 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by polyglot View Post
    You can figure this out from the ratio of the film sizes, which is easy in this case because 6x7 (55x69mm) is basically the same aspect ratio as 4x5 film (95x115mm), and the ratio of the two sizes is about 115/69=1.66. If you're familiar with 6x7 and want to think about 4x5 options, keep that 1.66 number in mind for all your conversions.

    To get the same field of view, you need 110*1.66 = 180mm lens. And for the same DOF, f/(2.8*1.66) = f/4.5. And because of the smaller relative aperture, you need 1.66^2 = 2.8x (about 1.5 stops) more illumination, exposure time or sensitivity.

    f/4.5 lenses are not real common on 4x5 but they do exist, e.g. Xenars. Most people just cheap out and buy modern f/5.6 lenses and ignore that last half-stop - you won't be able to shoot in as low light as you can with the RZ; you will need 2 stops more light (f/5.6 vs f/2.8) than the RZ does. That's the tradeoff with bigger film.

    If you go to 8x10 that's a doubling, so it's 2 more stops of light required over what 4x5 needs.
    Great explanation. Thanks polyglot. Am looking at sinar f2 at the moment. Indoor portrait with the odd outdoor shoot.
    Speed Graphic, Fuji GX680,Pentax 67, Mamiya RZ67, Mamiya 645 1000s, Nikon F5, Nikon Fm2

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