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  1. #11
    Gimarc's Avatar
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    I also was interested in getting one. I own a Sekonic L-558 Dualmaster - anyone here know how it compares with the Pentax Spotmeter?

  2. #12
    wildbill's Avatar
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    The pentax never has matched any sekonic I've tried it against. That said, my pentax gives me chromes that are 100% on. If you aren't using the zone system, also look at the minolta F, easy to find, easy to "self-calibrate". Its the only modern meter i know of that can be user adjusted.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #13
    Gimarc's Avatar
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    Thanks wildbill. Forgive my ignorance, but do you mean that the Sekonic is no good? Could you please make an example, for me to better understand? I am trying to understand how worse off I am with what I have and if there is anything I can do to partially make up for the quality loss.
    The Sekonic is all I have for now - I'll keep an eye out for a Pentax, although they are pretty rare where I live - and I just want to make the most of it.
    Last edited by Gimarc; 12-12-2012 at 10:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #14
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    sekonic has good reputation, and their spotmeter ang their combo meters are probably fine for what you want to do. the pentax has a few ergonomic advantagesbut it's more important fo you to be really familiar with your meter and that your film testing was done with your meter.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  5. #15

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    I agree with Ralph's sunny 16 standard so long as your readings are consistent. Why stress over the meter too much when your shutters could be all over the place. Familiarity with your set-up is key.

  6. #16
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    shutters are easily 1/3 stop off. apertures are usually within 1/10 stop.errors may add up or average out if your lucky. your film will forgive some error.if in doubt over expose and under develop.multigrade papers help to correct exposure and processing errors to some extend. as long as you err on the plus side of exposure. meter accuracy is not a big deal.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #17
    wildbill's Avatar
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    "meter accuracy is not a big deal" that's just ludicrous!
    Ralph, while I do own your book and respect your knowledge, I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around that statement. The op didn't say whether they were shooting b+w, color neg, or transparency film. There isn't room for error when shooting transparency film and I don't think most folks here can afford to bracket it. Having the meter set on 100 asa for example instead of 64 or 160 decreases the chance that a beginner (or pro) will make an error when changing films or adding filter/bellows factors. Starting with an accurate meter rules out one of many variables in the equation.
    Last edited by wildbill; 12-13-2012 at 09:14 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gimarc View Post
    I also was interested in getting one. I own a Sekonic L-558 Dualmaster - anyone here know how it compares with the Pentax Spotmeter?
    It (L558)does a lot more in terms of functions and features. As for spot metering capability... not much different except it (L558) will integrate multiple readings, which can be a valuable feature.

  9. #19
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    If you use a meter, any meter, and shoot some chrome with it, the results will tell immediately tell you if the meter is reading somewhat "correctly" (assuming the camera is in the ballpark)

    Reading a spot meter in and of itself is a bit subjective, as is the exposure that one might choose from the readings. One can easily use any meter, calibrated or not, so long as its roughly correct and so long as one is familiar with the meter and camera. It's the desired exposure that one is after. How that is arrived at is less important.

    Most modern meters don't need calibration to be close enough. How you use the meter, and how you interpret the results is a vastly larger variable that is only mitigated with experience with a specific regimen and the results thereof.

    A day of testing handily trumps an infinite amount of calibrations.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 12-13-2012 at 09:37 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Suggesting that some error on a meter is tolerable because the shutter speeds are likely to be off
    anyway is ludicrous. That's what shutter testers are for. First thing I do with any new leaf-shutter
    lens or even curtain shutter in a small camera is to test the shutter speeds. It's like telling the highway patrolman that it doesn't matter what the speedometer said, because the weight of your
    foot on the gas pedal is the real variable! I'll agree that the most important thing is just getting accustomed to your own specific meter and what results it produces. But the advantage of a spot
    meter like the Pentax is quickly comparing mids, high, and low values. So you need linear accuracy,
    not just hypothetical gray card value. Sometimes a meter which still reads correctly in the middle
    nonetheless is due for a recalibatration at the extremes.

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