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  1. #11

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    In addition to what everybody else said, a Cokin holder and a 1 and 2 stop gradient filter are good for sunsets.
    When you have money to spare.

  2. #12

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    The basic colors have been mentioned and I agree with the screw-in brass such as B+W or Heliopan. The square filters require a filter holder and are frequently resin (I'm not sure anyone is making glass ones now) or gel so extra care not to scratch them and more bulk because of the holder could be an issue.

    http://www.jeffreyglasser.com/

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I use the same filters for my MF Mamiya 645's and my LF lenses and these are predominatly Cokin P series, makes life much simpler, I could use them with my 35mm cameras as well if I wanted.

    Ian

  4. #14
    PDH
    PDH is offline

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    I have an old set of Kodak gels that I use with my 210, I have both Cokin and SVII VI oadpators for screw in filters for my other lens for the 135, 152. My gels are really old. Does Kodak even make gel fiters?

  5. #15

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    Kodak gel filters are still being manufactured, for now, but are surprisingly expensive. On the B&H web site they go from thirty to over one hundred dollars, depending on the filter. This will date me, but I remember when they were alot cheaper than glass and could be had for three or four dollars. My advise is to invest in some B&W or Heliopan filters, multicoated if you can afford them. It just doesn't make sense to put inferior glass in front of your fine optics.

  6. #16

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    Especially if you see yourself using graduated filters in the future, I would recommend using square (rectangular) ones. 4x4 inch the most common industry standard. Somehow Lee managed to get it into still photographers' heads that they make the best filters, but 4x4 filters are also standard in the movie industry, where Tiffen and Schneideroptics are well regarded. In Germany, for example, there are countless professional production rental companies that put filters up for sale with just micro scratches on the sides, nothing you would see in photographs, for 30-50 USD a piece. I would assume that similar deals can be had in the U.S. Well worth a look! Also the filter holders (matte boxes) from arri, and schneider come up for cheap on ebay from time to time, quality on these is phenomenal, compared with the Cokin and Lee plastic mounts.

  7. #17

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    I'd recommend multicoated screw-in glass filters for field use. Hoya is probably the best value out there, but for a little more money you can get heavier brass-mounted B&W or Heliopan. About all I
    ever seem to need is a 25 Red and either a yellow-green or a true green. Color photography is a more involved subject. I never use filters just to protect the lens, except on small cameras I might
    be using in the rain. With a view camera I protect the lens with some kind of compendium or other
    lens shade. Filters almost always have a slight negative effect on image sharpness, though that fact
    is often offset by helping cut thru haze. UV and skylight filters can be helpful in color photog, esp
    at high altitudes, but I never use them for black and white. I think most people get carried away and
    buy more filters than they actually need. I'd experiment just with the basics first.

  8. #18
    BradS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I think most people get carried away and buy more filters than they actually need. I'd experiment just with the basics first.
    I'd have to agree. I sure dd....buy way more filters than I really needed that is. They're fun to play with but...that soon wears off and then you just want to make good photos.

  9. #19
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    My LF camera lenses require slip on Series filters: Series , Series 7, Series 8.

    This gets Sirius, Seriesously!
    Last edited by Sirius Glass; 12-14-2012 at 05:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  10. #20

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    My largest lens takes a 77mm filter so I use step-up rings for my other lenses. Quality large filters are not cheap so I patiently bought all mine used off Ebay and saved a ton of money.

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