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  1. #11
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    If you now shoot at f/5.6, to get the same depth of field you'll be stopping down to about f/22 on a Calumet. You may need to provide more light for this. You can also use faster film in a LF camera and still get fine quality.

    Lens boards for the Calumet are easy to improvise from thin plywood with basic woodworking tools.

    Over many decades I've accumulated several tripods, but almost always use an old American made Tiltall, not the newer imported models. Many other tripods would do as well. Price is not necessarily an indication of function and durability. Don't skimp on tripods. Cameras may come and go; a good tripod can last a lifetime.

    The Calumet and Cambo are decent cameras, but so are many others such as the Graphic View II and the Burke & James. Rather than search for a specific brand and model, I'd settle for whatever is available in good condition at the right price. Often buying a view camera with a lens that fits your needs is cheaper than buying them seperately.

    Knowledge is power. One or more good books on LF photography are worth their cost. This site and http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/ are treasure-troves of information.

  2. #12
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    The other thought here is to make sure the camera has a long enough rail to deal with your chosen focal length plus a fair chunk. Some have been shortened.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  3. #13

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    Thanks Dan, The more I hear from you guys, the more I realize I should hold back and educate myself rather than diving in. Assuming I purchased a Camumet CC-401, and they come in 3 sizes, what size would I need if I did decide to use a 300mm lens? Thanks also for those links, I'll take a look now.

  4. #14

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    Thanks everyone, The more I hear from you guys, the more I realize I should hold back and educate myself rather than diving in. Dan & Mark, assuming I purchased a Camumet CC-401and they come in 3 sizes, what size would I need if I did decide to use a 300mm lens? Thanks also for those links, I'll take a look now.
    Jim, I'm currently using my monoblocs on pretty low settings so I'm sure I can crank them up for an eqivalent exposure. Can you recommend a good reference on large format as I'm heavy with book vouchers following Christmas!
    Ed, I've printed out your reply and I'm going to try to get my head around it later tonight.
    Thanks again, I appreciate you taking the time to help me out. Chris

  5. #15
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Chris

    There also several lengths of bellows. I'd say for what you are considering 18" extension would work nicely.

    A 300mm/12" lens racked out to 24" extension gets you 1:1 macro which can be nice for detail/product shots.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joburger View Post
    Thanks Dan, The more I hear from you guys, the more I realize I should hold back and educate myself rather than diving in. Assuming I purchased a Camumet CC-401, and they come in 3 sizes, what size would I need if I did decide to use a 300mm lens? Thanks also for those links, I'll take a look now.
    Go here http://www.cameraeccentric.com/html/info/calumet_2.html and read. The dimensions are on page 8. The CC-401 is the longest Calumet.

    I suspect that the only posters in this thread who actually have a Calumet view camera are me and Mr. Jones. I have a CC-401. Those of you who don't have one should read the catalog (the link is in this post) so that in the future you'll post less silly advice.

  7. #17
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    My favorite LF photography book is View Camera Techniques by Leslie Stroebel. It is the most technical in my library. Early editions are somewhat dated, though. The many books, fairly new and rather old, by Ansel Adams are good. Often recommended is Using the View Camera by Steve Simmons. Two others are A User's Guide to the View Camera by Jim Stone and The View Camera by Harvey Shaman. I'd have to go through all of these to refresh an aging memory before ranking them. For us who use older equipment, newer books have few advantages over some of the old classics. If possible, examine the books available in libraries and book stores to select what seems most suitable to you. No one book covers every aspect of LF photography lucidly and thoroughly.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    I suspect that the only posters in this thread who actually have a Calumet view camera are me and Mr. Jones.
    SC-IIR, since about 1982.

    p.s. Where in the thread did the CC series become the primary subject? Given the good prices available on SC series... that might be a better option.
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 12-26-2012 at 12:00 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    SC-IIR, since about 1982.

    p.s. Where in the thread did the CC series become the primary subject? Given the good prices available on SC series... that might be a better option.
    See posts #14 and #8 in this thread. As I read the thread, post #8 was the first to point out that Calument offered at least two very different ranges of 4x5 cameras. Post #14 makes it clear that the OP is focused, for better or for worse, on Calumet CCs, not on Cambo SCs, also gives the impression that the OP is somewhat resistant to advice, i.e., doesn't follow links ...

    Brian, as teaching instruments go the bulletin board has many weaknesses. You've just provided a nice example of one. Failure to pay attention to questions.

  10. #20

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    I understood the question in post 1, Dan. The way I read it, the OP is doing a lot of thinking... some "out loud". Yes, after you mentioned the CC the OP started thinking along that line. But I read it that the thinking has not yet been sufficient to reach a concensus on opinion or direction and is still fairly open to alternatives.

    So... to the OP: Of Dan's two suggestions, I'd add that you might consider looking at the SC series as an better option if you are focused on a Calumet/Cambo camera. It is newer and there are more accessories/options easily/affordably available.
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 12-26-2012 at 12:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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