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  1. #21

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    Dan, I couldn't get the link on my computer for some reason (it has developed a number of issues recently) I just got it up on my wife's and page 8 ansers my question so thank you.
    Jim, thanks for the references, I managed to find a copy of Jim Stone's book.
    Brian, you are dead right, I'm thinking out loud and having trouble just working out how to post on a forum which I've never done brfore let alone decide on what view camera equipment to purchase! Thanks gentlemen.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    Go here http://www.cameraeccentric.com/html/info/calumet_2.html and read. The dimensions are on page 8. The CC-401 is the longest Calumet.

    I suspect that the only posters in this thread who actually have a Calumet view camera are me and Mr. Jones. I have a CC-401. Those of you who don't have one should read the catalog (the link is in this post) so that in the future you'll post less silly advice.
    Thanks for that, No I do not have a Calumet, but unless they have managed to change the laws of physics what has having a Calumet got to do with my post, and at which point does it become silly exactly? I suspect many new users of large format cameras are not immediately aware of the requirement of allowing for the bellows extension and are thus surprised when their first attempts are under-exposed.

  3. #23
    dpn
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    I second the Tiltall recommendation for a sturdy, cheap tripod. I have an old Leitz-branded one that I bought at an estate sale for $50. It stinks like rancid lubricant grease and cigarette smoke, but it's quite solid with my RB67 + 180mm lens. I have to imagine that it'd be great for a 4x5 view camera as well.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Bray View Post
    Thanks for that, No I do not have a Calumet, but unless they have managed to change the laws of physics what has having a Calumet got to do with my post, and at which point does it become silly exactly? I suspect many new users of large format cameras are not immediately aware of the requirement of allowing for the bellows extension and are thus surprised when their first attempts are under-exposed.
    Ed, what set me off was a suggestion to the effect that the OP would need 24" of bellows to shoot at 1:1 with a 300 mm lens. This is absolutely true, but seems a little odd in context because the OP seems to want a CC-401. Very capable camera and all that, but its catalogued maximum extension is 21".

    What was missing was the news that a CC-401 won't go to 1:1 with a 300 mm lens and a suggestion to the effect that if that was very important to the OP then a CC-401 probably wasn't the right camera for him. Funny thing is, in post #1 in this thread the OP said that his goal was to shoot portraits with flash in a studio. I worked for most of my life as a statistical/management consultant and one of the first things I learned was to pay attention to -- extract it by torture, ideally without refinements of cruelty, if necessary -- what the client wanted to accomplish.

    IMO the best advice in this discussion came from Jim Jones, who suggested that the OP read a few books before doing anything else. I've suggested the same books to beginners, am a little ashamed that I didn't beat Jim to it.

    Cheers,

    Dan

  5. #25

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    Tiltalls are great. I use one with my Crown Graphic 4x5 press camera but I wouldn't think of using it with my heavy Sinar P 4x5 monorail.

    Even using a lightweight monorail you need a heavier tripod. Just think about it. At one end you have your heavy 300mm f/5.6 lens and at the other end the ground glass and film holder. For close-up portraits you will have your bellows racked out so your weight will be at each end and not directly over the tripod. For close-up portraiture I like a big, heavy monster that is like a rock. Even if I bump into the thing it won't move.

  6. #26

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    Sources for Books

    After you have cruised the Library offerings and have an idea of which books suit your needs Abe in particular, and Better World to a lesser extent usually will have copies of the various editions available at a nicely reasonable prices.


    Abe Books
    http://www.abebooks.com/?cm_mmc=ggl-...FcU-MgodfjcAow

    Better wold Books
    http://www.betterworldbooks.com/

    Best
    George

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpn View Post
    I second the Tiltall recommendation for a sturdy, cheap tripod. ... I have to imagine that it'd be great for a 4x5 view camera as well.
    I always went heavier than that. I use an olde Manfrotto/Bogen 3050 (or maybe it is a 3051). Bigger is better -- the Cambo monorails with long rails are heavy and unweildy. I find a big and heavy tripod tames the camera better, especially when used indoors in a studio to take portraits as the OP intends... or near the car trunk when taken into the field.
    Last edited by BrianShaw; 12-27-2012 at 10:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #28
    dpn
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianShaw View Post
    I always went heavier than that. I use an olde Manfrotto/Bogen 3050 (or maybe it is a 3051). Bigger is better -- the Cambo monorails with long rails are heavy and unweildy. I find a big and heavy tripod tames the camera better, especially when used indoors in a studio to take portraits as the OP intends... or near the car trunk when taken into the field.
    Good to know! I've toyed with the idea of acquiring an inexpensive 4x5 view camera from time to time, and had assumed that the Tiltall would be adequate. Thanks for the info!

  9. #29
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    I've used Tiltalls indoors and outdoors with cameras up to 5x7. A heavier tripod would be better when the wind is blowing, especially with long exposures.

  10. #30

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    The OP is looking for a tripod to use in his studio so carrying it around is not an issue. He just wants something to support his camera and won't break the bank.

    Why buy a Tiltall that may just get you by when you can pick up a rock solid Majestic for just a little more money?

    On occasion I have also seen studio stands go cheap on Craigslist. Yes, they are more expensive than a Majestic but they are really nice if you have the room to use them.

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