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  1. #21
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakmaya View Post
    Got myself a 210 schneider used. The 90mm was too much to afford now.
    A good choice - My kit consists of four main lenses, 90mm, 135mm, 180mm, and a 300mm. When out shooting, the 135mm & 180mm lenses get used most often, the 300mm is sometimes used, and the 90mm, rarely. I would recommend spending time with the 210mm, get use to it and the foibles of 5x4. Once you are happy with the results you're getting, think about a shorter lens. Maybe go out shooting with another LF user and try out his/her lenses (if they share the same lens board dimensions).

    Watch out for the image circle on the shorter lenses - A 150mm Xenar has room for very limited movements, and a 135mm Xenotar will only just cover 5x4 stopped down. As a comparison, the Fujinon 135W (early version) has an image circle of 228mm which gives you around 1.5" of movements.

    Don't get too hung up on lenses & gear - Just go out and have fun

  2. #22

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    Good Morning,

    In regard to the previous posts discussing T-Max and T-Max RS developers, I will add my thoughts.

    The regular T-Max is recommended for 35mm and roll film. For years however, I failed to notice that warning on the bottle and processed many hundreds of 4 x 5 sheets (mostly T-100, some T-400) in that developer, generally at 1:7 dilution from concentrate. My negatives are all pristine, showing no sign whatsoever of the dichroic fog which others may have experienced. I don't know why that is; I can only speculate that local differences in water characteristics or quality may contribute to some users having problems while I've never had any at all. My advice is to give regular T-Max a try on some non-critical sheet film. If it works, continue to use it; if not, go to the RS version.

    Konical
    Last edited by Konical; 01-03-2013 at 07:45 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: corrected spelling

  3. #23
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    I agree with Konical. A well aged jug of T-Max diluted in distilled water worked well when used once in trays and discarded. Now I dilute just enough in distilled water for one session and discard it. Negatives from a few decades ago are still fine.

  4. #24

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    This may be heresy, but I think it's worth pointing out that in large format, lens quality is *much* less critical than it is in the 35mm world from which the OP is coming, because (1) the enlargement factor is so much less, and (2) typical apertures are so much smaller. (There's nothing unusual in the 35mm world about shooting a Tessar at f/4, where its technical limitations become pretty obvious. There are lots of Tessar-type LF lenses around, but it would be unusual to shoot them as fast as f/11, and good luck even finding one that goes to f/4!)

    The point is, for exploring the format and discovering whether it works for you, BUY CHEAP LENSES. I just glanced at KEH's lenses in the 135mm range, and I would suggest, for instance, that the $199 for a 135/5.6 Symmar-S would be better bang for the buck than the $751 for a 135/5.6 Apo-Sironar. (Or the $2,699 for a 135/3.5 Planar! Holy @#$*.)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  5. #25
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Wait why not use Tmax dev??
    Aside from not being recommended by Kodak, no reason at all. As others have posted, try it. It may be just fine for you. Me, I just don't use TMax developer. When I was starting out I used all kinds of different developers, and I can to the conclusion that I could get by with just a few. I've been using D-76, premixed A-B Pyro from Photographer's Formulary, Xtol, and Ilfosol-S. Acutally, that's probably too many developers. But usually I use Pyro or Xtol.

    (Note to OP: don't start with Pyro. You need to handle it with gloves, as it's noted for having bad reactions with human skin. Other developers have less-problematic chemicals, and there are some non-Metol developers if you have sensitivities.)

    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    This may be heresy, but I think it's worth pointing out that in large format, lens quality is *much* less critical than it is in the 35mm world from which the OP is coming, ...
    +1. Just do some test shots, and see where the sweet spot for your lens happens to be. After I aligned my Super Graphic, I found that the 135mm Wollensak Optar lens gave me bicycle spokes two blocks away.

  6. #26

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    So far.

    Thanks everyone for getting me started. For the last 2 weeks were, I was in the process of getting the setup ready. i.e to get used to the whole pipeline (from shooting to processing)

    Yesterday I did my first real tray processing using HP5+. Two things I noticed:
    -> Tray processing is definitely cost effective. I am thinking in 250ml, I can get 4 -6 sheets a go. Until I get experience, next few months I will go with 2 at a time.
    -> I need to get/do few more things to make everything more smooth:
    1. Need a dark cloth for focusing. My bath towel is a little bulky.
    2. Need a way to store up exposed sheets (I don't have a spare box yet). Taking it out of holders, and straight to the dev is tricky. I was afraid of getting it scratched.
    3. Def need a better way to keep time. I am thinking of recording a music and playing it in iphone
    4. Agitation. Here, I am thinking consistency is much more important than perfect timing.

    -> For carrying it around, I bought a think tank street walker pro. Very light bag and everything fits fine with almost 2/3rd of the space still free.

    Overall I like it. I will need to take it out next week to see how everything fare.

  7. #27
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I started with a 4"x5" Pacemaker Speed Graphic because it can be used hand held, has limited movements when using it as a field camera, and can be resold or traded without much if any loss. I was so happy with it that I later go a 4"x5" Graflex Model D. Both can be used with barrel lenses [sans shutter]. Consider starting with a press camera.

    After trying tray development and then a series of daylight 4'x5" tanks in an increasing price order, I found that, in spite of the costs, getting a Jobo processor and the Jobo 3010 Expert Tank was well worth the expense. Now I can develop both color and black & white 35mm, 120 and 4"x5" film with very little effort and a highly repeatable quality.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #28
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakmaya View Post
    -> Tray processing is definitely cost effective. I am thinking in 250ml, I can get 4 -6 sheets a go. Until I get experience, next few months I will go with 2 at a time.
    Tried processing in an open tray and very quickly got hold of a Paterson Orbital - Have also tried the Combiplan and Jobo 25xx tanks. I'll maybe set the Combiplans up as part of a dip'n'dunk line if I ever need to do a bulk of processing.

    -> I need to get/do few more things to make everything more smooth:
    1. Need a dark cloth for focusing. My bath towel is a little bulky.
    Have a look around a haberdashery store - I found a length of coated nylon, black on one side, silver on the other and showerproof. With some velcro stitched on, it wraps around the camera quite nicely - Also has a dressmaker's tape sewn down one side which is handy when doing close-up shots.

    Others use a teeshirt or one of them specially made jobbies that look similar - If you go for a "proper" darkcloth, avoid the ones with lead weights sewn in to the edges.

    2. Need a way to store up exposed sheets (I don't have a spare box yet). Taking it out of holders, and straight to the dev is tricky. I was afraid of getting it scratched.
    Got a papersafe ?
    I use a small one when working through a stack of films as it saves on having to fight with the boxes & bag.

    3. Def need a better way to keep time. I am thinking of recording a music and playing it in iphone
    A cheap kitchen timer that beeps on reaching a set time, or you can get a dedicated darkroom process timer (Paterson still make/sell them).

    4. Agitation. Here, I am thinking consistency is much more important than perfect timing.
    10-15 seconds on an eight minute development regime is not going to make enough of a difference to see.

  9. #29
    Brian C. Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rakmaya View Post
    3. Def need a better way to keep time. I am thinking of recording a music and playing it in iphone
    4. Agitation. Here, I am thinking consistency is much more important than perfect timing.
    You can make a recording of yourself counting out the time. Or just look around for an iPhone timing app. I know there is at least one free darkroom app for iPhones. (I use a normal timer in the darkroom.)

  10. #30
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    You can get used GraLab timers here at APUG for $15 to $30. They last a long time and can be used to time an enlarger when you get one.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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