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Thread: 4x5 Lens on 6X9

  1. #1

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    4x5 Lens on 6X9

    I am planning to buy the Shen-Hao TFC69-A, which is a view camera with full movements but with 120 roll film. I have a 4x5 camera, and a 180mm lens, so I am wondering what the crop factor is for using 4x5 lenses on 6x9, e.g. on APS-C, a 50mm full-frame lens is a 75mm equivalent (I believe, haven't used digital in while )? Hopefully, I would like to only invest in 4x5 lenses and mount on small boards which I can use between cameras. The Shen-Hao can accept lenses from 52mm - 190mm.

    Also, in terms of bellows, would I still be limited to the 190mm equivalent (so if the crop factor was 2x, then I would only be able to use 4x5 lenses up to 95mm) or could I use an actual 190mm 4X5 lens (I highly doubt it, but its worth asking )?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what you mean by crop factors or APS-C but the diagonal of 6x9cm is around 105mm and the diagonal of 4x5" is around 150mm. A 180mm on 6x9cm camera is slightly long. In general, lenses that cover 4x5" format will work fine on your Shen-Hao TFC69-A.

  3. #3
    nicholai's Avatar
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    As far as my knowledge goes, 190mm focal length is 190mm focal length regardless of format, only the angle of view will be different.
    Nicholai Nissen
    Kolding, Denmark
    nicholainissen@gmail.com

  4. #4

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    Oh, dear. Focal length is focal length. Extension is extension. You don't need no steenkin' crop factors. Put the idea out of your mind.

    Now, about the little Shen Hao. Cute little camera.

    The manufacturer's spec sheet (http://www.shen-hao.com/PRODUCTSabout.aspx?i=933&id=n3) says that minimum extension is 52 mm, maximum is 190 mm. Any lens with a flange-focal distance no shorter than 52 mm and no longer than 190 mm (but read on about longer lenses) can be used on the camera. 47/5.6 SA XL and 45/4.5 Apo Grandagon both have flange-focal distances > 52.0 mm, are probably the shortest lenses you can use. A plain 47/5.6 SA "multicoating" in #0 should just make it. My older 47/5.6 SA in #00 won't quite. At the long end, if you want to get reasonably close (1:10) the longest lens that will work without heroic measures (extension tube between shutter and board, "top hat" board) is around 170 mm. A lens with 190 mm flange-focal distance will just focus to infinity, and no closer, on the little Shen.

    I shoot 2x3 with, mainly, Graphics. No movements to speak of. I also have a 2x3 Cambo monorail, prefer the Graphics. You can read about how I've used them at http://www.galerie-photo.com/telecha...2011-03-29.pdf If you need movements, a Graphic is not for you.

    ic, the normal focal length (= format's diagonal) for 2x3 is 100 mm. To my way of thinking, 180 is more than slightly long. I'm a little surprised that it doesn't offer double extension, I've always thought that was the norm. Oh, well.

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    Ohhhh, shame on me!!!!! I forgot that it doesn't matter on large format. Thanks for the clarity guys!

    @Dan Fromm - I'll give your guide a read, thanks!

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    180 is like a short telephoto, on 645 140-150mm is a good head and shoulders portrait length.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by F/1.4 View Post
    180 is like a short telephoto, on 645 140-150mm is a good head and shoulders portrait length.
    Yeah, yeah, but 645 is half frame 6x9.

  8. #8

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    Anyone speaking digitalese should have their mouth washed out with soap before posting again. 6x9 is
    a different shape than 4x5, so an exact ratio makes no sense anyway. Being a smaller area of film potentially requiring more enlargement means you will want very sharp lenses for high quality work.
    I personally often use a Fuji 180 with 6x9 exposures and it is a superb performer. It has about the same "feel" as when shooting a 240 on 4x5, but again, a little more linear or panoramic rectangle.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by crop factors or APS-C but the diagonal of 6x9cm is around 105mm and the diagonal of 4x5" is around 150mm. A 180mm on 6x9cm camera is slightly long. In general, lenses that cover 4x5" format will work fine on your Shen-Hao TFC69-A.
    "crop factor"? Cropping is done under the enlarger.

  10. #10

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    The 'standard' focal length on almost any traditional folding 6x9 camera is 105mm. So a 180mm lens would be a medium verging on long telephoto equivalent if you accept the 105mm standard lens analogy. So for instance a 90mm (Angulon perhaps) would therefore be a slightly wider than standard lens, perhaps (off the top of my head) a 40mm equivalent in 35mm terms.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

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