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  1. #1

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    What makes for a well-equipped 8x10 set up?

    Please indulge me for a few moments.

    I have come across a Zone VI 8x10 camera and several pieces of equipment along with it (another camera and equipment, too, but forget that for the time being).

    What accessories do you really need for an 8 x 10 Camera to feel "complete"? What wouldn't you include?

    There are filters, a tripod, film, an auxiliary lens, a light meter, developing tanks, an enlarger, and other things, but I'm trying to focus in on just the photography aspect for now--maybe not so much the developing.

    I appreciate any responses.

    PhotOptik

  2. #2
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    --I have a Zone VI 8x10, also.
    Something to haul it all around in
    Film holders -- brush and canned air for cleaning them -- and for brushing off film holders before putting them in the camera.
    Darkcloth
    Sturdy tripod
    I prefer a spot meter
    Notebook for keeping notes, pencil
    Small screwdriver for loose screws (such as the ones on the sliders that hold the back on). Pocket knife will do.
    Lens and lensboard, cable release
    Cleaning supplies for lens
    Something to keep time with for those long exposures..."one anseladams, twoanseladams..." gets old after a few minutes.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  3. #3
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    PhotOptik,

    There you have it. If you still feel like the list is incomplete, maybe a yellow filter.

  4. #4
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Some items from my personal camera-side checklist:

    (01) 8x10 camera
    (02) Heavy duty tripod with proper head
    (03) Film holders (with spare boxes for on-site storage after reloading)
    (04) Lenses on lensboards (with lens caps!)
    (05) Homemade viewfinder to be used before unpacking camera
    (06) Meter(s)
    (07) Compendium lens shade
    (08) Filters/holder
    (09) Cable release(s)
    (10) 4x5 and/or 5x7 reduction backs (optional)
    (11) Roll film back (optional)
    (12) Dark cloth
    (13) Ground glass magnifier, loupe, or hi-mag glasses
    (14) Ground glass cover/protector
    (15) Toolkit/micro screwdrivers
    (16) Small torpedo bubble level (to confirm verticals/horizontals)
    (17) Vacuum/dust brush for loading film holders
    (18) Opaque black photo tape (for bellows leaks, etc.)
    (19) Small flashlight (to check for those leaks)
    (20) Dust-Off canned air
    (21) Lens cleaner/brush
    (22) Changing bag (for emergencies)
    (23) Notebook or digital voice recorder for notes
    (24) On-site lodging with windowless bathroom for film loading
    (25) Harrison dark tent for bathrooms with windows
    (26) Cases for all of the above equipment
    (27) Robust dolly for all of the equipment cases

    And mostly...

    (28) The patience to slow down and enjoy a different approach to photography that most photographers will do anything in their power to avoid.



    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  5. #5
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    Forget about the slow film and the long exposures, believing you'll get to stop down and get all that "sharpness". That's baloney Use whatever 100 or faster film and shoot about f/16. Remember, it's not sharp if the leaves and the grass are moving, which they ALWAYS are. ...
    Does not match my experience, but then I have been using LF for only 35 years...
    And everyone's mileage differs!
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #6
    JLP
    JLP is offline
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    Does not match my experience, but then I have been using LF for only 35 years...
    And everyone's mileage differs!
    Or, as the saying goes, we are not young enough to know it all!
    _______________
    Jan Pedersen
    http://janlpedersen.com

  7. #7

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    Ummm.
    If you're in the deep woods, when it's overcast, and perhaps using a filter, you'll have all the opportunity for timing long exposures you want. In fact, you may even find yourself wishing for some 1000 speed film...

    I find the sweep seconds hand on my wristwatch a very handy thing.

  8. #8
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noacronym View Post
    Forget about the slow film and the long exposures, believing you'll get to stop down and get all that "sharpness". That's baloney Use whatever 100 or faster film and shoot about f/16. Remember, it's not sharp if the leaves and the grass are moving, which they ALWAYS are. Q-tips for the lens. Make sure they're genuine Q-tip brand COTTON. Distilled water with a few drops of Windex in it.
    After only a few years more than 60 of LF and ULF photography I have learned all statements in this quote are incorrect except "...the leaves and grass are always moving."
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  9. #9
    dpurdy's Avatar
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    I have a zone 6 8x10 and I am a bare essentials guy (who started shooting 8x10 in the 1970s)

    Tripod. In the studio I use a very large Bogen with geared column but going out doors I use a much smaller Gitzo but still a heavy duty Bogen head.
    Lens. Start with one and get used to it. Get another when you get frustrated with the first one.
    Shutter release cable.
    Loupe. I like 4x the best.
    Dark cloth. Large.
    Film in holders..... in package that keeps them clean.
    Meter.
    Lens shade maybe but you can always use the dark slide to shade the lens.
    Hat... like a baseball cap with a brim. The dark cloth messes up your hair anyway.
    If you find yourself stretching out the bellow you will need some thing to sit on the camera bed under the bellows to prop them up. I use an empty duct tape roll.

    Dennis

  10. #10
    M.A.Longmore's Avatar
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    A copy of " Using The View Camera " by Steve Simmons.
    And a jogging stroller !

    Ron
    .
    Last edited by M.A.Longmore; 04-05-2013 at 05:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.



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