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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,625
    It's hard to make just one camera design do everything. For versatility in studio use, car travel or on dayhikes when resorting to 4x5 (versus 8x10), I prefer a Sinar monorail. For airline use or long backpacks, I put a priority on lighter weight and signficantly better compactness, and carry an Ebony folder. In both cases I need well-built rigid cameras that will take wind and hold settings. There are lots
    of good choices out there. The most important thing is to get familiar with your gear to the point of
    using it spontaneously. That whole base-tilt vs axis-tilt debate is perhaps a bit overblown. Either is
    easy enough if the equipment is well made.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    839
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    It's hard to make just one camera design do everything. ... That whole base-tilt vs axis-tilt debate is perhaps a bit overblown. Either is
    easy enough if the equipment is well made.
    Agreed!

    It does take a little time to get base tilts down pat, but a couple hours of intensive practice along with a good reference (Stoebel's "View Camera Technique" for example) is usually all it takes.

    Weight and portability are of prime importance to me. I've tried to put together the lightest and most compact field kit I could. I have basic wooden folders (Wista DX/Horseman Woodman) and very compact lenses. I carry my gear in a lumbar pack and fly-fishing vest. This enables me to do a bit of scrambling and climbing that a larger pack would maybe interfere with.

    Most important is what the individual finds most essential; weight, flexibility or asymmetrical movements on both standards. That said, I really think that asymmetrical movements are largely superfluous. They may give a bit more accuracy in the initial movement and thereby save an iteration, but that's really only a few seconds in a rather long process anyway...

    Best,

    Doremus
    Last edited by Doremus Scudder; 04-20-2013 at 03:28 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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