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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Montgomery, Il/USA
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    It's also going to make a difference depending what camera you're going to use.
    Most 45's, but not all will compress the bellows enough to use a 90, but shorter will definitely need a bag bellows or recessed lensboard. Some cameras that allow compressing the bellows enough may not allow movements. You would need interchangeable bellows.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  2. #32

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    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post

    90 mm lenses are often used on 4x5. So are shorter ones. You probably won't know which short focal length(s) is(are) best for you until you try several.

    These days it is hard to lose a lot of money on used LF lenses, although at the moment prices of older 90s with limited coverage (Angulons, Wolly Optars/Raptars) may be on the high side because of a small craze for a new hand-holdable 4x5 camera that's designed around them. If I were you, depending on budget, I'd get a 90/8 Super Angulon and use it. I have an early one in #00 shutter; it is in terrible condition, I use it as a paperweight. Hold out for a newer one in #0 shutter. Same optics, shutter that's much easier to live with.

    There are other similar lenses from Fuji, Nikon, and Rodenstock. I just took a look at keh.com, who have two 90/8 Fujinons at quite reasonable prices for that sort of thing. I buy most of my gear through eBay but keh is safer to deal with than sellers on eBay.

    How you like it will guide you to what you'll like best. I'm sorry, but imagination and trying to reason from what you like on smaller formats aren't as good guides as one would think. You really have to get a lens, nearly any lens, and try it out. If it doesn't suit, sell it.


    Good luck, have fun, and remember that everything you do will be wrong,

    Dan
    Reread all this. Everything here is spot on and great advice for someone starting out, especially the last line!

    I would add one thing. Caltar lenses can be a bargain sometimes. The later ones are rebadged Rodenstocks and Schneiders. Same lens, cheaper price.

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