Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,846   Posts: 1,582,728   Online: 896
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Regina Canada (sounds more fun than it is)
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    605

    Avoiding breaking ground glass while hiking.

    I recently purchased a Lowepro Rover Pro hiking backpack, as I am getting into doing more hiking. Since I am wanting to take my 5x7 with me, I have become concerned that the ground glass might break once everything is loaded in the bag and I start walking. Is there a practical way of protecting the glass? I would fold the camera up as much as possible but should I put some cloth over the glass or put the back in a separate compartment to ensure it's safety? Even a large padded envelope? I have a 4x5 back I bring as well. Just the camera, holders, tripod and bag are almost 30lbs already, so I am trying to keep the weight down.

    Thanks.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    US
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    2,060
    If the groundglass is at all recessed in the frame, how about getting a sheet of thin wood of some kind at the hobby store, cut it to size, and jam it in the frame, perhaps with some foam or something attached to the edges so it will keep itself jammed in there but easy enough to snag a corner and pull it out. Or use some big rubber bands around the camera to hold it there.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    883
    Buy or make yourself a ground glass protector that slips in like a filmholder and covers the outside of the glass as well.

    See here http://mpex.com/ground-glass-protector-5x7.html for one example. Many other places (View Camera Store, Calumet, etc.) have them as well. Google is your friend.

    Best,

    Doremus


    www.DoremusScudder.com

  4. #4
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,905
    Blog Entries
    1
    Firewall plywood from the hobby shop is an answer. Don't rest it on the glass. Hold it against the back of the camera with rubber bands.
    Another alternative, and even lighter, is thin plastic from a plastics dealer. Hold it above a heat source, be careful you are not too close, and bend it so that one side can be slid into the camera where the film holders go.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  5. #5
    Terry Christian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Memphis, TN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    595
    Images
    18
    I made a protector like the one Tom1956 mentioned. I cut two pieces of Lexan plexiglas, one slightly smaller than the other to fit into the camera like a film holder. I then made a hinge out of gaffer's tape to connect them, and i use a ball bungee to wrap around them and the ground glass on the camera. It works well for my Calumet monorail.

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,428
    Images
    148
    On many LF cameras the focus hood doubles as a screen protector. I'd not seen the protectors Doremus links to but they look ideal.

    Ian

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,344
    I made a protector for my 8x10 a few years ago by cutting a piece of scrap 1/8" mahogany plywood ("lauan" or 1/8" "door skin") to the appropriate size and shape with a kraft knife and gluing a piece of felt to the side that faced the glass. I put 4 small pieces of Velcro on it and the frame that holds the glass to hold it in place. Total cost about $2.00.

  8. #8
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Regina Canada (sounds more fun than it is)
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    605
    Thanks everyone, some great ideas. For reference, it is an Agfa Ansco field camera (not a monorail), so the rear extension can fold up to offer some protection. More or less, what I am hearing, is the basic idea of a insert that wraps around but does not actually touch the glass (or only the padding/felt) touches the glass. Does this provide enough protection from the regular bumps/knocks that walking would give? Perhaps the glass is stronger than I think but I just don't want to drive for 10-hours, hike for 5 and can't take the picture because of broken glass.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,665
    Images
    344
    Bubble wrap?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    16,428
    Images
    148
    As it's an Agfa Ansco I'd make a bublle wrap piece - card/bunbble wrap to place between the rear extension and the camera back. I use 10x8 agfa Anscos and I don't envy you the weight !!!!

    Ian

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin