Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,900   Posts: 1,584,390   Online: 662
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 45
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Ah! Maybe I only looked at Freestyle, but then again 85 bucks for ten sheets is really out of my impulse buy range! B&H shows 25 sheets of Ilford HP5 for $99.97 which would be a lot more attractive per sheet cost, and Freestyle has their Arista.EDU Ultra 100 as 50 sheets for $123+, but that's still a lot of lattes just to get started! Last year I used the Arista stuff in 4x5 pretty happily, but I could get a 25 sheet box for less than $20 at the time.
    It's worth every penny at almost $9 per sheet. I've learned more from using my 8x10 than all the other cameras combined.

  2. #12
    msbarnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    382
    Images
    7
    This sounds encouraging I guess going from 120 to 8x10 is not ludicrous?
    Michael | tumblr

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    This sounds encouraging I guess going from 120 to 8x10 is not ludicrous?
    If you've never used sheet film and a camera with movements, there will be a learning curve. Use X-ray film for that, or get a 4x5 back to learn with. Get a 4x5 back anyway. There's a huge difference, going from any 120 camera to 8x10.

    Edit - This is about the best online resource. http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/forum.php

  4. #14
    msbarnes's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    382
    Images
    7
    Thanks, yeah thinking about the price is still kind of daunting. I've read about sheet film and heard the experience, I'll look into xray film or get 4x5, which is a lot more portable so not really redundant.
    Michael | tumblr

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    Thanks, yeah thinking about the price is still kind of daunting. I've read about sheet film and heard the experience, I'll look into xray film or get 4x5, which is a lot more portable so not really redundant.
    Using sheet film is not difficult, you just need to learn how and that will involve making mistakes. There's huge list of ways to screw up an LF exposure, so do it the cheapest way possible. You can get X-ray film for about the cost of 4x5, maybe less. If it encourages you at all, I bet it's been 20 years since I trashed a sheet of 8x10 film.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,011
    Quote Originally Posted by msbarnes View Post
    This sounds encouraging I guess going from 120 to 8x10 is not ludicrous?
    E. and I both belong to Large Format Photography Forum. A lot of people on there suggest starting out with 4x5 so your initial investment is lower. Buy used and you can always sell for close to what you paid if you decide it's not for you. Of course you can always sell your 8x10 gear in the same manner.

    I started out with 4x5 but I could just as easily started out with 8x10. If your heart is set on 8x10 then go for it.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Adirondacks
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,679
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    E. and I both belong to Large Format Photography Forum. A lot of people on there suggest starting out with 4x5 so your initial investment is lower. Buy used and you can always sell for close to what you paid if you decide it's not for you. Of course you can always sell your 8x10 gear in the same manner.

    I started out with 4x5 but I could just as easily started out with 8x10. If your heart is set on 8x10 then go for it.
    I heartily concur.

  8. #18
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,193
    Images
    6
    As for 8x10 film, I sometime shoot Fuji HRT Xray film. About $32 for a 100 sheet box.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/HRT-810-FUJI...item27c3d10f7b

    Keep in mind that it's not panochromatic or sharp. For portraits, it might be what you want.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  9. #19
    TheToadMen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Netherlands, Europe
    Shooter
    Pinhole
    Posts
    1,658
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    32
    If you're gonna buy a set, look for a set WITH filmholders. Buying filmholders seperate can be rather expensive. And if you buy an old model wooden camera you might need special model filmholders, that may not be available anymore. So check this first before you buy.
    If in doubt, ask on the forum: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/forum.php
    You can also browse this forum first to get an idea what is out there and what to look for.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  10. #20
    smieglitz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,866
    Images
    97
    Get an 8x10 from the start if you like those 8x10s from Avedon, etc.

    I think the choice comes down to whether you want to enlarge negatives or make contact prints. I prefer the latter and have done various alternative processes with bigger negatives (5x7 mainly). If you start with a 4x5 I think you'll find you will want bigger prints and then you are talking about buying a 4x5 enlarger, big enlarging lens, bigger darkroom, etc.

    The initial cost of 8x10 is not that daunting (to me at least). You can find nice 8x10 cameras for $400-$500, possibly with a holder or two. An older 300mm lens in a shutter might run $100 more than newer one for a 4x5. And, I think you will slow down and consider your shots more before you release the shutter with the more expensive, larger film. So, don't think of the film cost difference because you will be shooting differently. There are also some technical differences like shallower depth-of-field with 8x10 lenses. And the bulk and weight are quite different between the two formats. You won't be able to carry as many filmholders comfortably with 8x10, but that also fits with the more contemplative approach of the larger format. It also means you probably won't need to invest in a whole bunch of more expensive holders. Backpacking? 4x5 wins but otherwise I'd go with the larger format. Its apples and oranges really.

    And, as others have said, you can probably sell the equipment down the line for about what you paid for it. I think that is probably truer with 8x10 than 4x5.

    You can also shoot smaller formats with 5x7 or 4x5 reducing backs on an 8x10.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin