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  1. #21

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    Smieglitz makes good points.
    My 8x10 came with a 4x5 reducing back and two 8x10 Folmer wood filmholders. I've accumulated six more for a total of eight matching holders, the most I've ever taken out is four. I've never enlarged an 8x10, although I plan on building a horizontal enlarger.

    For portraits I use a 16 1/2" Artar.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 05-18-2013 at 01:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    As for 8x10 film, I sometime shoot Fuji HRT Xray film. About $32 for a 100 sheet box.

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/HRT-810-FUJI...item27c3d10f7b

    Keep in mind that it's not panochromatic or sharp. For portraits, it might be what you want.
    Thanks for that link, I have a box on the way for pinhole play. Earlier this year I figured I spent enough on filmholders and materials for the camera that I didn't want to add $80+ to the outlay for film (next WPPD, all bets are off!). Hopefully I can repair the hinge tape in one holder by the time I have film in hand. I found some book binding repair tape at Blick's that I believe should work. (Another hazard with antiques of unkknown age and provenance.)

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Smieglitz makes good points.
    My 8x10 came with a 4x5 reducing back and two 8x10 Folmer wood filmholders. I've accumulated six more for a total of eight matching holders, the most I've ever taken out is four. I've never enlarged an 8x10, although I plan on building a horizontal enlarger.

    For portraits I use a 16 1/2" Artar.
    I own a 4x5 reducing back for my Wehman. It's nice to have.

    I looked at Ebay one day and saw 3 film holders plus a Kodak book and some dip and dunk frames buy it now for $30.00 with free shipping. You wouldn't believe how fast I hit the keyboard. Later I purchased a cardboard box full of film holders from a young lady whose father had passed. I have been very lucky!

    How do you like the 16 1/2" Artar? I own a 14" Commercial Ektar but would love to own a 19" Artar for landscape but fear it may be too sharp for portraits. Of course I could always use a diffusion filter in front of it.

  4. #24
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    There is one Fidelity holder 8x1"0 now on Ebay for $ 0.21 ??
    See:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=111072331119
    It ends in 7 hours from now.
    I don't know this seller but he has 100%.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  5. #25
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheToadMen View Post
    There is one Fidelity holder 8x1"0 now on Ebay for $ 0.21 ??
    See:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...m=111072331119
    It ends in 7 hours from now.
    I don't know this seller but he has 100%.
    Hehe, you could get lucky, but most of the action in ePrey auctions is in the last few minutes. A couple of months back when I bought my holders, I monitored completed sales for a week or so. The older wooden flavor actually sold for an average of $32 and the newer more modern ones, over $52. Generally the cheaper end of the sales were holders with some flaw - maybe not unusable, but missing latches or minor damage. I suppose over a longer time span you might hit an occasional flyer.

  6. #26
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    But if you admire portraits on 8x10 - you will be compromising if you use 4x5 instead.

    Contact prints and retouching are two things that are better done on 8x10.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Thanks for that link, I have a box on the way for pinhole play. Earlier this year I figured I spent enough on filmholders and materials for the camera that I didn't want to add $80+ to the outlay for film (next WPPD, all bets are off!). Hopefully I can repair the hinge tape in one holder by the time I have film in hand. I found some book binding repair tape at Blick's that I believe should work. (Another hazard with antiques of unkknown age and provenance.)
    Black book binding tape is fine for re-doing hinges. I have a roll of the stuff made by Lineco (the folks who make archival linen hinging tape for matting and framing).

  8. #28
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Hehe, you could get lucky, but most of the action in ePrey auctions is in the last few minutes. A couple of months back when I bought my holders, I monitored completed sales for a week or so. The older wooden flavor actually sold for an average of $32 and the newer more modern ones, over $52. Generally the cheaper end of the sales were holders with some flaw - maybe not unusable, but missing latches or minor damage. I suppose over a longer time span you might hit an occasional flyer.
    This one sold for $32.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  9. #29

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    Wow. Where to start.

    You are not Avadon. 8x10 portraits are... a major learning curve. Exposure, lighting, perspective, DOF, subject movement etc.
    4x5 portraits are not quite as easy as you think either. Jumping from MF is easy in some respects and quite challenging in others.

    I shoot 8x10 because the tonal and intense image granularity blow me away, always have. But.. I started out with 4x5, lived with it for 20 some years, moved for a short time to 5x7, then found the camera of my dreams, an early 70s Deardorff V-8. And I still have 4x5 and 5x7 backs for it but they are hardly used. I use it to shoot landscapes exclusively. Contact print (8x10 - 5x7) only.

    If I were you, I would buy a quality 4x5 monorail with full movements, a couple good lens, and a 4x5 MXT enlarger. If you really like LF, then go for the gold. Learn the basics first.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  10. #30
    msbarnes's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by k_jupiter View Post
    Wow. Where to start.

    You are not Avadon. 8x10 portraits are... a major learning curve. Exposure, lighting, perspective, DOF, subject movement etc.
    4x5 portraits are not quite as easy as you think either. Jumping from MF is easy in some respects and quite challenging in others.

    I shoot 8x10 because the tonal and intense image granularity blow me away, always have. But.. I started out with 4x5, lived with it for 20 some years, moved for a short time to 5x7, then found the camera of my dreams, an early 70s Deardorff V-8. And I still have 4x5 and 5x7 backs for it but they are hardly used. I use it to shoot landscapes exclusively. Contact print (8x10 - 5x7) only.

    If I were you, I would buy a quality 4x5 monorail with full movements, a couple good lens, and a 4x5 MXT enlarger. If you really like LF, then go for the gold. Learn the basics first.

    tim in san jose
    True.

    I'm still weighing the pros and cons.
    I am just fancying this idea and so I haven't looked in-depth but are there some semi-affordable (~$1k)metal field cameras? I'd prefer a more portable unit at the expense of movements. I know that there are plenty in the 4x5 world from graflex to linhof and several ones in between but I've never looked into 8x10. I was just trying to figure out if this were really doable.

    So far the film is expensive for sure but I would just shoot less. Similarly I don't find 120 to be more expensive than 35mm because I shoot differently, more slowly.
    Michael | tumblr

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