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  1. #21

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Seattle, Washington area
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    449
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I wasn't talking about "camera" packs, but about real packs. Take that load you've got and add a week's worth of food, a tent, and all your
    essentials for the outdoors and then see how well it holds up.
    Totally agree. I don't do much real backpacking anymore (age has caught up with me), but did do a lot in the past and always used the original U.S. Kelty external packframes. Still have two of them - not for sale, but for nostalgia. They held up well under 82 lb loads that included climbing gear for glacier travel with Sinar Norma 4x5. 5x7 and 8x10 are a different story.

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
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    8x10 Format
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    2,601
    A lot of people bought nice gear way back when and never even used it. Within the last two years I've picked up a brand new Calif-made
    Kelty pack that just sat in someone's closet for decades, as well as several brand new vintage Camp Trails US mfg packs - all of these cost
    over $200 way back in the 70's, but I got one of em at a garage sale trading for a half empty qt of marine varnish. These were way better
    built than packs nowadays and I find them suitable for almost everything except as an airline carryon. For the latter application I have a good legal-sized airporter pack with shoulder straps tucked away. It will accept my Ebony 4x5 system or a 6x7 system, including my Gitzo carbon-fiber tripod and filmholders. I wouldn't want to do any serious backpacking that way, however. Now all I gotta do to be really in style for old
    age backpacking with a vintage Kelty is to replace the handle on my wooden ice axe. Alas, I too opted for a modern fiberglass version after
    taking a particularly interesting downhill exodus. The point of the old wooden axe and half the shaft have been inadvertently donated to
    mountaineering posterity, still up there somewhere... Then a couple years ago I took a good dunking in ice water when one of my nice new fiberglass trekking poles snapped during an early season ford, so newer tech isn't always better! Fortunately, I keep all my photo gear, clothing, and sleeping bag etc double-wrapped in big plastic garbage bags just for such incidents.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Multi Format
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    196
    I loved my F64 backpack with the side pouches for the film holders. It is way lighter than the lowepro's I've had.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    494
    Photo backpacker is about to release an updated line of packs. You may want to check them out.

    Best regards,

    Bob
    Best regards,

    Bob
    CEO-CFO-EIEIO, Ret.

  5. #25
    Ari
    Ari is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
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    8x10 Format
    Posts
    324
    Lowepro Flipside 400 or 500; it's very comfortable to use all day, and holds a lot of gear while keeping a small profile.

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