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  1. #11
    Doc W's Avatar
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    I can only offer my opinion, based on experience, and, of course, our tastes and needs will differ. My opinion is that a Crown Graphic or Super Graphic would be ideal for you. They are inexpensive, light, and very portable. Crowns and Supers fold up to the size of a kids' lunch pail and easily fit into a small bag or backpack with everything else you will need. I used both for quite a while and they are great for portraits. The Super can also do a pretty good job on landscapes. They set up in seconds and you can even hand-hold them (after all, they are press cameras). And roll film backs for either are not that expensive. Once again, it is just my opinion, but the idea of carrying around a monorail, on a tripod no less, gives me a migraine.

  2. #12

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    Graflexes are nice, but it sounds like the guy needs some movements. For the money and ruggedness, Calumets and Tiltalls are way to go. They're not that hard to carry around. And you have no limit on movements.

  3. #13
    Doc W's Avatar
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    Tom, in another thread the OP said movements were not that important to him. Nonetheless, the Super has full front movements: rise, axis tilt, swing. It also has a rotatable back. It is a great camera.

  4. #14

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    Didn't know that. In that case a Graphic and a Tilltall would be perfect. Notice I am a Tiltall pusher. For a hundred bucks, it's the best tripod money you could spend.

  5. #15

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    Here's my experience FWIW. This all occurred withing the past 3-4 months so it is still perty fresh in my mind. I purchased a Sinar F1 because I wanted a "portable & modern" 4x5 camera. I got a 150mm APO Symmar to put on it. I put it all in a f.64 back-pack with 6 holders, a meter, filters, and a cable release. That weighs out to about 12-13 lbs. I considered that set-up to be a big bulky pain in the arse. So, I decided to search out the lightest & cheapest "modern" field camera that I could fit into my budget. I ended up ordering a newer Horseman 45HF from Tokyo. I now understand the 45HF's are somewhat rare on the US market. It was touted in the 80's advertising as being the lightest all-metal 4x5 field camera on the planet. I put a 150mm Geronar on it. I carry it in a over-the-shoulder bag with 6 holders, a meter, cable release, filters, and that set-up weighs in at about 7-8 lbs. Much less pain and bulk, by far. Carrying a lens board with a lens that doesn't fit "in" the camera is no big hurdle.
    Last edited by DannL; 06-05-2013 at 12:02 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16

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    I'll leave this thread to you guys. Don't want to hog it. Getting that big 8x10 late-model Horseman a few weeks ago, with the "L" arm on the rear standard, and hauling that around has given me a whole new perspective on seeing guys debating 4x5's. In the end, all you guys have good arguments on your favorites. As for me, I'm seeing in full glory why they call them Horseman. Actually a mule would probably be better to haul this boat anchor. A 4x5 is looking more like a Minox to me, here lately.

  7. #17
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    Tom, I love the Horseman. Even the way they look. One of the coolest big cameras around and certainly one of the most well-made.

    My 8x10 is a 1950s all-metal Kodak Master 8x10. It is not that heavy - around 12-13 lbs, I think - and it folds up beautifully. I have two different methods of transport:

    1) For urban photography or in any situation where I am only hauling it a short distance from the car, I used an old suitcase on wheels. It holds the camera, a 14 inch Commercial Ektar, a 600mm Artar, 5x7 back, holders for both 8x10 and 5x7, incident meter, spot meter, loupe, cable release, note book and a few small odds and ends. I strap the tripod on top.

    2) For hiking in the woods, I use a large Lowepro backpack and it barely holds all the junk mentioned above. I usually have to bring a few less holders. Sometime I decide to go either 8x10 or 5x7 in advance, which lightens the load. Of course, when I get to where I want to go, I always want the other format. Rather than strapping the tripod to the pack, I carry it in hand, partly to balance the weight of the backpack and partly to defend myself in case of a zombie attack.

  8. #18

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    Last edited by Tom1956; 06-05-2013 at 12:48 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    I'll leave this thread to you guys. Don't want to hog it. Getting that big 8x10 late-model Horseman a few weeks ago, with the "L" arm on the rear standard, and hauling that around has given me a whole new perspective on seeing guys debating 4x5's. In the end, all you guys have good arguments on your favorites. As for me, I'm seeing in full glory why they call them Horseman. Actually a mule would probably be better to haul this boat anchor. A 4x5 is looking more like a Minox to me, here lately.
    Tom, you really must see how Joel Meyerowitz carries his 8x10 over his shoulder on the tripod.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UspoolSnZtg

    it is a nice little film, but if you want to miss out the bulk the bit in question is right at the end.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  10. #20
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I agree with Doc W, if you're on a budget or not the Super Graphic is a great camera, I don't really recommend Crown Graphics due to their lack of movements, I do use one at times.

    Choice of camera is quite personal, I had a couple of monorails, I bought the first a De Vere WP, HP & 5x4 in the mid 1970's and it was just impractical to use outside a studio because of it's weight and size so I switched to a Wista 45DX for its portabiity. In 27 yeras I've never run out of movements with the Wista and the De Vere sat unused until sold last year, I had a second monorail (A Cambo) and used that in the UK on occasional trips back it was practical to use out in the lnadscape but I much prefered a field camera.

    By chance I found a Speed Graphic for a bargain price - it had some issues which I resolved (replaced some parts). This became my main5x4 camera in Turkey, enough movements for my uses and very quick to set up reasonably light and easy to use hand held.

    I like to work quickly and once I'm in the locations Im shooting in carry my LF cameras set up ready on a tripod, (as in the above video). I also shoot 10x8 and carry my agfa Anscos thesame way.

    Ian

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