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  1. #1
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Using Fuji X-Ray film Green HRT as a negative

    I have no experience (yet) with the Fuji X-Ray film, but I'm going to order some straight at Fuji Medicals HQ overhere in Europe. I have sent them an email inquiring. They replied quickly and are willing to send it to my company. They asked me first though if I understood it was X-Ray film for medical purposes, what I wanted it for and how I wanted to develop it - to make sure I didn't get the wrong stuff for my photograhy. But when I explained the experiences from people on this forum it was no problem at all.

    I'm going for Fuji Green HRT. I made this choice after reading a lot of discussions on APUG and viewing a lot of prints from these negatives.

    These sizes are available:
    S-HRT 18x24 cm : €91.48
    S-HRT 24x30 cm : €152.65
    S-HRT 30x40 cm : €254.31
    S-HRT 35x35 cm : €240.77

    Every box contains 100 sheets of film. Prices including VAT.
    About the sizes: 1 inch = 2.54 centimeters (cm).

    I'm going to get me the 18x24 cm size for my old Russian FKD plate camera and the 35x35 cm for a wooden pinhole camera I'm going to build. It's not that expensive and I like to test something new also.

    BTW: if there is someone who would like to join this order, send me a PM. Only add shipping costs to your address.

    Bert from Holland
    http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

  2. #2

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    This film is not sensitized for visible light and there is no published speed for visible light. You would do far better buying conventional film. Good luck.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    This film is not sensitized for visible light and there is no published speed for visible light. You would do far better buying conventional film. Good luck.
    My understanding is that it is (intentionally) sensitive to visible light, green in fact. The x-ray filmholders place some sort of thin film of phosphors against the film and those emit visible light when radiated.

    I just got a package of 8x10 (inches) but haven't had a chance to play yet.

    Edit:
    Since the sensitivity affects how much people and pets have to be zapped, I would expect that although the published specs may not read like those for photographic film, its characteristics are likely as tightly controlled.
    Last edited by DWThomas; 06-05-2013 at 05:49 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: another thought ...

  4. #4
    Tom1956's Avatar
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    Everything you'd want to know on the subject here:
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...-on-X-ray-film

  5. #5
    dmb
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    This film is not sensitized for visible light and there is no published speed for visible light. You would do far better buying conventional film. Good luck.
    Most X Ray film IS sensitive to visible light as to reduce dosage to patients a phosphor screen is placed next to the film that emits visible light in response to the X Rays. The common fims are sensitive to GREEN or to BLUE - hence the film names - Film speeds are reported to be around the 200 to 400 ISO range.

  6. #6

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    The film is sensitized for the output of the phosphor screen. This sensitization may be for only a very narrow band of the green spectrum. Still this film was never intended for exposure with continuous visible light spectra. At the very best colors other than blue and green are going to register as black.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 06-05-2013 at 06:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
    Tom1956's Avatar
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    Basically it is an orthochromatic film with emulsion on both sides. Following the link I posted will show what beautiful work can be done on ortho x-ray film. Not having pan is not the end of the world. I just bought an 8x10 Horseman specifically to get out there and shoot the same film the OP is talking about. 31 dollars/100 beats the heck out of the pan prices.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Basically it is an orthochromatic film
    Just because an emulsion is sensitive to a portion of the green spectrum does not make it an orthochromatic film One would have to compare the spectral sensitivity of this film with a conventional orthochromatic one.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9
    Tom1956's Avatar
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    I investigated the idea before jumping in and buying this Horseman 8x10 for this purpose. X-ray blue is a colorblind film like Mathew Brady's, and green is sensitive to blue and green. I've seen the sensitivity graphs and they're pretty flat across that end of the spectrum. There ARE problems as compared to the high-price pan films, but the least of the problems is money. As for me, I simply refuse to pay 70 or 80 dollars for a 10 sheet box of photographic film. Ridiculous. My first idea was to shoot paper negatives, but the x-ray film looks like a better way to go. At least I'll be out there shooting 8x10, as until now, I've been shooting nothing. All things considered, not a bad gig.

    Sorry OP for hogging your thread.

  10. #10
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    @Gerald: You're absolutely right about this film not being meant for "normal" photography of visible light, but it seems to be usable.
    Just type in Fuji HRT at Flickr and you'll see nice examples. Here are a few (at random):

    using a 8x10 camera

    using a pinhole camera

    developed in HC-110

    grandfather

    These examples are good enough for me to try it myself. I agree with Tom about prices too. I can't hardly find any good film for reasonable prices for my old Russian FLD plate camera, using 18x24 cm negatives. A box of Ilford Fuli FP4+ costs about €130 for 50 sheets.
    The best price of normal film seems to be Fomapan 100 (50 sheets) for € 80.
    But the X-Ray film is 100 sheets for €92 so the cheapest to experiment with, especially in my self build wooden pinhole cameras.
    And I love a good experiment.

    Oh, and Tom: no hogging taken - you're welcome.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * "So much time and so little to do. Wait a minute. Strike that. Reverse it. Thank you." (the original Willy Wonka: Gene Wilder, 1971)
    * My favorite cameras: Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T2, Nikon F4s, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras

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