Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,707   Posts: 1,548,545   Online: 1167
      
Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 51
  1. #31

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    164
    I got myself a Shen Hao HZXIIA a couple of months ago. It is a joy to use and easier adjusted then the Toyo 45A i prefiously owned. Much better focussing screen, much more and easier movements and a lot lighter. I especially like how the movements on the back work, which makes using tilt and shift there so much easier, compared to the Toyo. The disadvantage being that the Toyo is a more rigid and stable camera.

    Then there is the bellows of the Shen Hao: even the standard bellows is very flexibel and i have no problems using my 58 SA XL on it on a flat lensboard and apply so much rise it runs out of coverage easely. I guess it will also take the 47 on a flat lensboard.

    And swapping bellows is easy, tho i wouldn't know why i should want to swap it as the standard one takes all my lenses, from the 58 SA XL to my 360 Tele Xenar

  2. #32
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,392
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    438
    Roger- If memory serves, you can probably get a 210 to infinity with the bag on, but it's not a good idea, as the bag is likely to intrude into the lens' image circle because it lacks structure and is likely to sag. I should say the bellows are sufficiently compressed with a 90 that movements are highly restricted- but this is true of just about any field camera of similar design ($2000 Ebonys and Canham DLCs excepted). The bellows changing is easy - I would NOT leave the bag bellows permanently attached - they don't fold into the body well. To change the bellows on a Shen Hao, you loosen a clip on the rear of the front standard, then unscrew two screws (with big black knobs) on the rear standard, and out pops the bellows!

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    869
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    The Tachihara can focus a 65mm on a flat board? The Shen HZX bellows is fully compressed with a 90 on a flat board?
    Roger, when I purchased my camera, Tachihara recommended using a 90mm on a flat board and a 65mm in a recessed board. The 65 is the widest lens Tachihara recommended using.

    I got into a discussion about this on the Large Format Photography Forum. I think it may have something to do with how old and supple your bellows are and how much movement you are looking for. After I purchased my Tachihara I picked up a 75mm lens and used it in a recessed board and it worked fine for me. Of course my bellows was new and stiff. The 75 proved to be too wide for my tastes so I switched to a 90 and use it on a flat board. Several people in the discussion used a 75mm on a flat board and one fellow claimed he used a 65mm on a flat board and still got enough movement for him.

    If you are looking for lots of movement with wide lenses you might want to look for a camera which supports a bag bellows. One of the features that I really like with the Tachihara is using a 90mm on a flat board and not needing to swap bellows.

    As you well know, there is no perfect camera. I't all about finding the one that works the best for you while still being affordable.

  4. #34
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,936
    Thanks all. The info about using a 58 on a flat board with movements on the HZXAII is intriguing.

    I like the Chamonix but with several boxes of IR film in the freezer I'd like to use it!

  5. #35

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    869
    If I was buying new today I would take a hard look at the Chamonix. I haven't shot IR since my 35mm days though.

  6. #36
    winger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Page County, IA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,425
    Images
    47
    I'm fairly sure I'm going to buy a new Chamonix. Though I'd love to shoot some IR, I don't have any and can likely come up with a temporary fix if I ever get some (and it's down to one or two versions anyway). Other than that, I haven't heard any reasons to not get one and I think any other differences are so small as to not matter. It comes highly rated by those who have them (and they rarely come up for sale used, so I'd believe those who have them want to keep them).
    Thanks all for the input! I hope it all helps anyone else who finds this thread.

  7. #37
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,936
    The "easy" solution for an IR safe bellows for the Chamonix is the Shen bag, which fits it and IS IR safe. But it's only a bag bellows.

    I also admit I like the look of the wood bed on the Shen better than the CF bed of the Chamonix, though I'm pretty sure the CF is probably actually better.

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    869
    The Chamonix is newer than the Tachihara and Shen Hao so there are not as many out there on the used market. I have seen a couple come up in the Large Format Photography Forum for sale section.

    You are right that most people who own them seem to love them.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    164
    I will post a few snaps of the Shen Hao with the 58 on a flat board tomorrow, as it is both too late and too darkto take decent ones now.

  10. #40
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,392
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    438
    Roger- the older Shen Haos anyway were made out of teak. They used teak for the decks of battleships, so I'm pretty sure it is durable enough to handle whatever you throw at it.

Page 4 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin