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  1. #21

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    Oct 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldBikerPete View Post
    Just to underline what everybody else has said. Everybody's preferences are different.
    I shoot landscapes only and my lens kit is all Nikon - 65, 90, 135 and 210 mm

    Note that if you start with the 65, each next bigger lens is about 1.5 the focal length of the previous smaller lens.
    I'm missing a 300mm out of that set but I'm keeping an eye on for-sale classifieds.

    Peter.
    The Nikkor 300-M f/9 is a fantastic lens for landscape. You will love it!

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Aug 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    The Nikkor 300-M f/9 is a fantastic lens for landscape. You will love it!
    I've had one for over 20 years, used it a few times and never printed from the negatives. I'd sell it except it's my only 10x8 lens with flash sync (of that FL).

    We don't really have the wide open landscapes in the UK for lenses like the 300mm M Nikon, I don't in Turkey either (where I shoot). Maybe it's my way of working I found a 135mm to long for 35mm and later used mostly the 70-90mm end of my 70-210 zoom.

    A down side to the 300mm Nikon is they require full extension on most 5x4 cameras which can be problematic if there's any wind or breeze about, in many ways a 270mm Tele lens would be much more practical but a bit heavier.

    Ian

  3. #23

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    Jul 2011
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    I'd keep things simple until you've gotten past the learning curve. Pick a single lens. Just make sure it has an ample image circle for its focal
    length. But it is indeed funny how different people gravitate toward different angles of perspective. Last year I was backpacking for a couple weeks with a pal who only owns and uses wide-angle lenses, while every single lens I was carrying was conspicuously longer than "normal" - yet we were shooting the same nominal subject matter. My own predilection for narrow perspective seems to be the case with every single format
    I use, whether 35mm, MF, 4x5, or 8x10. I do own some wide-angle lenses, but only use them a small percent of the time, generally for architectural subjects.

  4. #24

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    Nov 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wagg View Post
    Unlike 35mm where there are myriads of choice and medium format where for the most part you stick with the lens of the system you choose, large format is to me to be the place where all the serious photographic work has been and continues to be done.
    Really?

    I find that odd for as a professional shooter who uses 35mm, 120 and 4x5 to earn good money off of landscapes, the mindset around the subject, light, timing and emotional connection to that subject is far more the "serious work" over what format I may choose to use. Don't get me wrong, I am not saying LF can not lead to serious imagery, but to be 100% honest, I find a lot of the work I see in LF to be very boring in terms of being a great photograph or not.

    Now if your focus is coming up with a bigger technically well put together negative regardless of it is a good photo or not, then yes, 4x5 and larger will allow you to do that. But if the end result is a photograph with the most impact, you probably ought to lose the gear mindset and work on more important aspects of photography.

    I still find I do my best work overall with 120, it is the best combination of fast setup and reaction time, dust prevention and large enough negative to make very nice silver gel prints from....

  5. #25

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    Jul 2009
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    Chicago
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    I've been buying lenses (almost all used) since I started in 4x5 more than 20 years ago.
    My full kit for the monorail ranges from 72 mm to 600 mm (both extremes require changing bellows and/or rail length).
    These are carried about on a cart in a collection of cheap Office Depot "catalog cases" which are a perfect fit for the boards with lens wraps around the mounted lenses (lenses mounted on 6" square Cambo boards).
    My minimal backpackable kit (lightest weight using a carbon-body Toyo field camera) is a Fujinon 150 mm and a Caltar 210 mm, which work for almost everything except high-rise architecture. The Toyo can be folded up with small lenses such as the Fujinon still mounted.

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