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  1. #11
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Got to play with a Sinar F once, and use the scales. It is darn handy when you have a well defined plane you are trying to focus on.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  2. #12

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    Indeed. My first LF camera was a Sinar A1. Should never have sold it. That's why I'm thinking about trying to find a Sinar F2 or a P2 (asymmetric tilts).

  3. #13
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    I actually had the great good luck of having Per Volquartz show me how to use it, it was his camera and we were at the mining museum in Tonopah Nevada.

    The most direct way I can put this is that asymmetric focusing moves LF from the realm of toy to tool.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    Sinar patented two completely different systems of yaw-free settings, one designed for the P-series, the other for the F series. Then other folks marketed yaw-free when their patents expired. This kind of control might be helpful in certain tabletop studio settings or for architectural photography when you're dealing with fairly consistent planes. ... But frankly, I don't pay any attention to it anymore, since I mainly encounter complex plane of focus issues in landscapes. And for architectural shots I generally level the camera first anyway. But I do use both axis-tilt and base-tilt cameras, or ones with both features, and it's just a matter of staying in practice with either. ... Having good equipment and being comfortable enough with it to operate spontaneously is far more important in my opinion than the general debate.

  5. #15

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    Here is a thought that has always messed with my sensibilities….

    If you have a lens with a very limited amount of movement, like my 65mm Grandagon, 170mm IC, 10mm of rise / fall / shift, would it not be better to apply rear tilt / swing rather than front tilt / swing since when you do the former, you are tilting or swinging the projected "Cone" of image circle all around rather than the back movements being adjustments to the plane of focus only?

    I just want to know if I am correct in my thinking that you would less likely run out of image circle if you make tilts and swings using the rear standard…is this right?
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  6. #16
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Yes PMK-25, less likely to run out of movement, BUT back swing and tilt messes with the geometry of the subject matter, parallax etc... Front swing and tilt does not.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Yes PMK-25, less likely to run out of movement, BUT back swing and tilt messes with the geometry of the subject matter, parallax etc... Front swing and tilt does not.
    Ah, right, like the David Muench "Flowers in your Face" effect. The 65mm is the only lens I have with a small IC / limited movements, the rest are either at or beyond the limits of the movements of my camera, so not really an issue.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  8. #18

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    One should become proficient with both back and front movements, or using them combined.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    One should become proficient with both back and front movements, or using them combined.

    One? I would think we all should...
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by markbarendt View Post
    Yes PMK-25, less likely to run out of movement, BUT back swing and tilt messes with the geometry of the subject matter, parallax etc... Front swing and tilt does not.
    parallax with a view camera?
    || Cezary Żemis <cezary.zemis@pronet.pl> | www.cezaryzemis.name
    || ph.:+49 176 7327 8527|skype:cezzem

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