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  1. #1

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    Question about asymmetric tilts

    The view cameras I've used all had base tilts so I have no experience with asymmetric. I know everyone has their preferences, but I'm trying to figure out if there is ever an advantage to base tilts vs (fixed axis) asymetric tilts when focusing. The applications I'm concerned with are landscape/urban landscape and architetcure. Not close-up or studio work.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2

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    On my camera I can tilt the lens in two ways, one is a base tilt, and one is rotating across the axis of the lens. I do mostly landscape, and use movement mostly to adjust the plane of focus, rather than perspective control.

    In the end both axis and base tilt do the same thing, but most of the time, I prefer the axis tilts since they are more independent of focus.

    I usually set up the camera, and focus on one portion of the image (point A) that I want in focus, I then add movement to bring a second point (point B) that I want in focus into sharp focus, then go back and adjust focus to get point A back into focus, and iterate until both points are in sharp focus at the same time, then adjust aperture to pull everything else that I want into focus, and expose. When using base tilt, I find that after I do the movement to bring point B into focus, there is more focus adjustment needed to get point A back, and more iterative steps until I have both in sharp focus.

  3. #3
    AgX
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    Asymmetric tilt gives

    -) a larger way over which to move the outer part of the image into focus

    -) (in case of adjustable tilt axis) the ability to place the axis at one point that needs to be in focus and then swing it untill the other important pont is in Focus.
    Then the framing can easily be corrected again. Makes life easy...

  4. #4

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    Thanks. Mark, that's how I've always worked too.

    AgX, got it, but are there circumstances under which it might actually be an advantage to have base tilts instead of asymmetric tilts? (of course assuming the asymmetric axis is fixed).

  5. #5
    ic-racer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    The view cameras I've used all had base tilts so I have no experience with asymmetric.
    Base tilt is asymmetric.

  6. #6
    AgX
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    With base tilt the axis is even out of the image area. That disqualifies it for being asymmetric.
    (Of course this all depends on definition.)

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Base tilt is asymmetric.
    True. Of course I mean asymmetric within the image area/ground glass.

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    You can find different ways of working with any system.

    The attraction of asymmetric tilts is that you can focus at the tilt/swing axis on the groundglass, tilt/swing the rear standard, and whatever is in focus at the axis will remain in focus while you tilt to find your second focus point. And then if you want the tilt on the front standard rather than the rear standard, you read the tilt angle using the scales or a separate device, and then apply the opposite tilt/swing to the front standard, and reset the rear standard to the neutral position, adjusting focus and composition using rise/fall/shift as necessary.

    For tabletop work, this is attractive, because the DOF is short and you might have a lot to get in focus, so cameras that have this feature tend to be studio cameras like the Sinar P and Linhof Kardan Master GTL, which have geared movements and scales. I know Ebony has asymmetric tilts and swings as well, but do they have scales? Without scales, you would need a device like a clinometer-compass to measure the tilt and swing angles to transfer movements from the rear to the front standard.

    In distant landscapes, it's not usually such an important feature, since the tilts and swings tend to be fairly slight. For architecture, where you're using rise/fall/shift more than tilts and swings, except for indirect rise/fall/shift, asymmetric tilts aren't so useful.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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    David, as far as I know the Ebony cameras (even the "U" models with asymmetric tilts) don't have any scales. I assume everything would be done by eye.

    My question has more to do with something like a Sinar P2 vs a Sinar F2, or a Sinar P2 vs any of the Arca Swiss cameras (which don't have this feature).

  10. #10
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    A Sinar P/P2 lets you determine the tilt angle on the rear standard by eye, and the scales let you apply that movement relatively easily to the front standard, if you want front tilt instead of rear. You could do the same on a camera without scales, like the Ebony, as long as you have a device for measuring the tilt and swing angles.

    An F/1/2 lets you determine the tilt angle with a built-in calculator, based on the near and far focus points that coincide with dashed lines on the groundglass, and once you know the angle from the calculator, you can apply it to either standard.

    Both work pretty well. The P is a bit faster to use, but the F is more portable.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

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