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  1. #11
    edp
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    Make sure your aperture blades are metal, and not the rubbery papery material that some earlier shutters have, before you dunk it in solvent and dissolve the aperture blades.

    Better still, don't soak them, take them apart and clean them properly. It's not difficult.

  2. #12
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    I prefer a few drops of IPA (not India Pale Ale)
    No. That's better in pints!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by edp View Post
    Better still, don't soak them, take them apart and clean them properly. It's not difficult.
    Definitely. You can use something like WD40 for cleaning (Kontakt 60, a spray for cleaning electric contacts, is also useful - it removes dirt very well and even some rust), provided that you swab the agent completely, the surfaces should be dry (shutter blades are designed to work dry rather than lubricated). A few days ago I did so with a sticky, old Compur #2, it took about 15 minutes + an hour to find a way how to access the blades.
    || Cezary Żemis <cezary.zemis@pronet.pl> | www.cezaryzemis.name
    || ph.:+49 176 7327 8527|skype:cezzem

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pasiasty View Post
    Definitely. You can use something like WD40 for cleaning (Kontakt 60, a spray for cleaning electric contacts, is also useful - it removes dirt very well and even some rust), provided that you swab the agent completely, the surfaces should be dry (shutter blades are designed to work dry rather than lubricated). A few days ago I did so with a sticky, old Compur #2, it took about 15 minutes + an hour to find a way how to access the blades.
    WD40 is a very last resort for corroded parts, it takes a bit of effort to remove completely, I've only used it on what were essentially junk shutters before I began restoration.

    Ian

  5. #15

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    Hello;
    Recently did a CLA on a dial set Compur. I usually take these completely apart and clean every part. I had to rework the escapement pawl to get the clockwork to work again. Take pictures with a digital camera so you have a record for reassembly. I do not like the squirt and shoot method for shutter repair. I like being able to lubricate important points to allow for long service. Steven.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Well, about 45 minutes ago, I just poured in a capful of 99% isopropyl and worked the controls and kept blowing until everything was pretty dry, and now I'm testing much better accuracy on my Compur than last night. Of course, there's probably some wetness still down in there providing a certain amount of lube (for the time being). No telling what my testing might show on it in a week. I hardly expect a permanent miracle. See my thread on the subject I started last night on shutter testing.
    Thw above post was last night. But now the shutter has gone for the most part right back to where it was in the first place. The speeds are close to 1/2 as marked.

  7. #17
    pasiasty's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    Thw above post was last night. But now the shutter has gone for the most part right back to where it was in the first place. The speeds are close to 1/2 as marked.
    That's why disassembling, cleaning and reassembling is preferred. If only blade mechanism is affected - i.e. shutter with removed blades works well - the whole procedure is quite easy and you don't have to disassemble the whole cocking and clock-work mechanism containing bazillion of elements. Of course - to determine this you have to partially dissemble the shutter, and if you do, there in no reason not to clean it. In my case (Compur #2) blades were accessible from the rear.
    || Cezary Żemis <cezary.zemis@pronet.pl> | www.cezaryzemis.name
    || ph.:+49 176 7327 8527|skype:cezzem

  8. #18

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    Why not WD-40?

    Well, WD-40 is basically kerosene, which is a good solvent, but it also contains some non-volatile, waxy material, which is left behind after the kerosene evaporates. *That* is what causes problems, because it will gum up the works, and it's devilishly hard to get rid of.

    WD-40: good for displacing water and removing/preventing rust, on stuff that's not camera equipment!

  9. #19
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    Alcohol is a slow acting solvent on dried up lubricants so soaking in it will not hurt any thing.
    A quick flush through the openings, works well for a while then goes back to sluggish/non working state = disassemble-CLA needed.

    Tip from American Restoration on the History channel: To remove rust without damaging old parts soak the rusted part in Cider Vinegar for 15 to 30 minutes then wash off. The part will start to rust back in a few hours to a day if not treated with oil, primer, or other rust inhibiting agent.

    I have restored a Compur Rapid 00 that had the shutter and aperture blades rusted and stuck to the adjoining blade. Disassembled the shutter, put the rusted parts in a jar and covered with Cider Vinegar and let sit for an hour. Took the blades out, wiped the vinegar off as the rust was floating/settling out in the vinegar, rubbed in extra fine powdered graphite to each cleaned part, reassembled. All speeds from 1 second to 1/100 second within a 20% tolerance, 1/200- 1/2 stop slow, 1/400-1 stop slow.
    Compur 0 non working, levers riveted to the main setting ring rusted and non moveable. Soaked in vinegar, wiped off, applied light oil, completed a full CLA, shutter within a 20% tolerance from 1 second to 1/125, 1/250-1/2 stop slow, 1/500- 1 1/2 stops slow.

    I have tried white vinegar to remove rust and it does not work.

    Compur shutter service manual: http://benoit.suaudeau.perso.neuf.fr...ir-manual.html
    Compur Rapid service manual: http://benoit.suaudeau.perso.neuf.fr...air%282%29.pdf

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by edp View Post
    Make sure your aperture blades are metal, and not the rubbery papery material that some earlier shutters have, before you dunk it in solvent and dissolve the aperture blades.

    Better still, don't soak them, take them apart and clean them properly. It's not difficult.
    Good call, that's what I've got apparently. Unless the metal blades have a matte finish. Lol
    5x7 Eastman-Kodak kit, under the knife for a bit
    4x5 Graphic View / Schneider 180 / Ektar 127
    RB67 Pro S / 50 4.5 / 90 3.8 / 180 4.5 / WLF / prism finder / polaback
    Random 35mm stuff

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