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  1. #11
    shutterfinger's Avatar
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    Nathan,
    Vintage lens have their own measurement for Shutter and Barrel sizes. They are not standardized from one brand to another. Modern shutters are standardized to Copal sizes. I do not know when the Copal standardization came about, probably the 1960's or 1970's. Best bet when buying used lens boards is by hole diameter not by shutter number size. If a seller cannot provide the hole diameter in millimeters skip it.

    Now, as previously mentioned, making your own is not that hard.
    A 4x5 Pacemaker lens board is: Left - right = 3.710 inch; Top - bottom = 3.648 inch.
    1/4 inch baltic birch plywood available at craft stores works well for lens boards. Start by cutting a blank then round the corners so that the blank just sits into the front standard opening. From the back mark the bellows opening. Remove the material outside of the bellows opening mark leaving a 1/16 - 3/32 thick lip between the bellows opening and outer edge of the board so that the board just sits into the front standard and the board locks just slide over the board. Drill the mount hole countersinking it if needed for the lens to fit. Paint the back side flat black, finish the front as you like. The board fitting into the bellows opening negates the need for the lip on the outer edge for the light trap.

    A Dremel in a router attachment with a straight cut bit works well for reducing the outer edge as does a table saw.
    A brake cylinder hone in a drill should work for enlarging a metal board hole also.
    Black acrylic works well also but is harder to work with. Sand the gloss off the back side. Black ABS sheet is difficult to work with and is slightly flexible.

    The factory aluminum boards are .049 inch thick.

  2. #12

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    A round hand file will get you that extra mm very easily, and I agree, a Dremel and a few appropriate bits is one handy, relatively inexpensive tool to have around the house.

  3. #13

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    hi nathan

    sorry for your troubles ...

    i use black board, or foamcore.
    draw a circle where the lens would go
    cut an X then cu the board out, slide the lens
    in / friction mount with a flange.
    it takes about 40seconds to do, and is cheap as dirt
    silver magnets, trickle tanks sold
    artwork often times sold for charity
    PM me for details

  4. #14

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    Another approach to such a problem: take board and lens to a camera repair shop and pay them to mount it for you. Doesn't cost much. Steve's Camera Repair in Culver City took care of one situation in which I was not able to do it by myself. I think the price was around $30... which is much less than the price of frustration.

  5. #15
    jp498's Avatar
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    For Pacemaker boards, http://www.ebay.com/itm/181226020577 is my favorite solution if I can't find a used one with the right hole size. They'll make a snazzy carbon fiber board with the hole size you specify.



    For anniversary/pre-anniversary, I make lensboards myself with a table saw and hole saw/drill press and thin finish plywood.


  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by shutterfinger View Post
    From the back mark the bellows opening. Remove the material outside of the bellows opening mark leaving a 1/16 - 3/32 thick lip between the bellows opening and outer edge of the board so that the board just sits into the front standard and the board locks just slide over the board.
    This is the part that I'd assumed wasn't feasible---getting that thin lip between the standard and the locks, without thinning the wood so much that it's a break waiting to happen. But if there's that much clearance...I've pointed my captive woodworker at this thread and I'll see what she says. She has a mess of thinstock available in interesting woods and historically has done a fine job on Eastman 2-D lensboards with it.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

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