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Thread: Beginning 8x10

  1. #11

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    Morten,

    I suspect that a lot of older 8x10 gear available in North America isn't as commonplace in europe. I don't know if you have a preference for new or used equipment either,or a wood field over monorail. Good examples can be found of both types, new and used. FWIW, If the budget will allow I'd suggest taking advantage of the strong euro and weak dollar and order one of the new Deardorffs---you'll probably want to hang on to it for the rest of your life!

    IMHO if you're shooting B&W and foregoing digital then there isn't anything to be gained buying the latest and greatest gear(my opinion---others may disagree!)

    What is commonly available world wide(if anything having to do with 8x10 can be considered common) is lenses. The big Ektars suitable for 8x10 might be a bit harder to come by in europe(I don't know), but Schneider G-Clarons and Goerz Dagors shouldn't be too hard to find in focal lengths from 240mm to 355/360mm and I think would work nicely for you. You might also come across a Symmar convertible(what were they? 360mm & 500mm??)

    Holders are another matter. In the US the ubiquitous wood Kodaks made by Graflex are cheap(est) and most plentiful. Once again I don't know the situation in europe. I've used Agfas and found them to be workable alternatives if they don't leak. The advantage to the Kodaks are that you can take them apart and putter with them. The Agfas I've had were riveted together limiting their potential for rebuilding. For plastic holders I've had good luck with Liscos. They are available used on ebay but they are also heavy. I don't know how the cost of shipping them to Denmark would add to the bill. You'd probably be better off seeing whats available locally. Calumet in Europe and Robert White in the UK would be good places to look for new and used holders. I'm sure there are others as well. Fortunately you probably only need three of the things for a good start.

    For a tripod, I've heard very good things about Berlebach which would probably be easier for you to get ahold of in europe than the US made Ries. If you're on a budget a surveyor's tripod is the way to go(IMHO) IMHO an 8x10 wants a heavy duty tripod. I suspect even lightwieght 8x10s like the Gowland benefit from being atop something with mass and substance---comlpete overkill for a 35mm though!

    Welcome to 8x10!

  2. #12
    Ole
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    I think I would stick to European camera models, faced with the same decision. While I have never conciously made this decision, I now have one Voigtländer 9x12, two Linhofs (4x5" and 5x7"), one nameless German plate camera in 18x24cm, and there's a 5x7" Gandolfi on the way.
    There are fewer 8x10" cameras offered on the European ebay versions, but the prices seem to be more sensible too - with the exception of the Gandolfi I bought, which was embarrasingly cheap.

    For lenses I have a 240/420 Symmar, a 165 Angulon, a 121 Super Angulon, and a 300mm Xenar which cover 8x10". I also have some older barrel lenses, but that's not the best to start with.

    Any Symmar between 240mm and 360mm is good. The 240 just covers with minimal movements, while the 360 is the longest which can be found in a shutter. Angulon only on 165 and 210mm, Xenar from 300mm (but the 300/f:4.5 is in a #5 Compound, the biggest shutter).

    I use a Stabil tripod with a Uniloc ballhead, which has no problem at all with any configuration of camera and lens. There's also the new Wolf tripods, http://www.wooden-tripods.com/index.htm which I only found out about today.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #13

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    There are good deals to be found in 8x10, if you don't mind used equipment. I have a Seneca (very similar to an Eastman field camera) and a 12 inch Commercial Ektar. My 8x10 is actually a lot lighter than my 4x5 (a metal Calumet monrail). What I gained in weight savings, I gave up in extensive movements. However, these old field cameras can sometimes be bought very cheaply, and can give very good results.

  4. #14
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    I think I would stick to European camera models,
    Why the US economy is bit unstable, so exchange rates favour Europe.

    I have just bought an amazing Agfa (Asnco) 10"x8" camera from the States. OK shipping and VAT added almost 2/3'rds to the cost, but I have bought a camera at a price far below it's European value even after taxes are paid.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Chinn
    What is your budget Morten? If we know what you can afford, we can make some pretty specific suggestions. For under $1000.00 (US) you can easily get a complete kit of camera lens and tripod.
    This price is ok. $1000 would be a possible amount of money to raise for me in a few months og saving. I am looking at the Shen-Hao 8x10.

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