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  1. #1
    smithdoor's Avatar
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    Bellows Exposure calculation

    If you need Bellows Exposure calculation down load with filter calculation[INDENT] Try this wheel for calculations

    Dave
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    Last edited by smithdoor; 11-05-2013 at 05:56 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    smithdoor's Avatar
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    Upload on aperture shutter speed table
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithdoor View Post
    Upload on aperture shutter speed table
    Well done, but Iprefer the method where a target disk is placed into the scene and it's size is measured on the ground glass .a ruler measures the disk diameter, which has a direct link to the exposure compensation required.
    good luck. ask for a free pdf of this method by sending a request to rlambrec@ymail.com
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4
    smithdoor's Avatar
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    Thank you
    I have look at the disk look good too.

    Dave


    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    Well done, but Iprefer the method where a target disk is placed into the scene and it's size is measured on the ground glass .a ruler measures the disk diameter, which has a direct link to the exposure compensation required.
    good luck. ask for a free pdf of this method by sending a request to rlambrec@ymail.com

  5. #5

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    A lot of that Lambrecht stuff I've seen is pretty easy, clear, and logical. That PDF download makes me want to keep my Kodak Master Photoguide more handy. Good effort though.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    A lot of that Lambrecht stuff I've seen is pretty easy, clear, and logical. That PDF download makes me want to keep my Kodak Master Photoguide more handy. Good effort though.
    I'm honored; thanks for the nice words, but let's not forget, I too have learned a lot from APUG.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  7. #7

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    A simple way to calculate exposure compensation is to use a ruler. I keep a small tape measure with me for this purpose.

    Follow along:

    1. In your mind convert your len's focal length to inches.

    Examples:

    90mm = 3.5"
    150mm = 6"
    210mm = 8.25"
    300mm = 12"

    2. Now focus any one of your lenses at infinity It will be it's mm length from the film plane. I use the film plane and the center of the front standard to measure from.

    3. In your mind convert the mm focal length to inches.

    Round it off to the closest f/number.
    In your mind call the resulting number an f/stop.
    For example my 210mm lens is 8.25" which is my f/8 lens.
    My 90mm lens is 3.5" which is my f/4 lens.
    150mm lens is 5.9" which is my f/5.6 lens.
    300mm lens is my f/11 lens (close enough to 12")

    4. When you are focused for your photograph use the tape measure to measure the distance from the film plane to the front standard reference point.

    Examples:

    Lets say for example that you are using a 210mm lens and it is focused at 11 inches. 210mm = "f/8" and my "f/8 lens" at 11' is f/11. f/8 to f/11 = One stop bellows compensation.

    Fast and accurate. Try it.

  8. #8
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Is this a futile attempt to convince the world to hang on to inches?
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #9
    ROL
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    Futile perhaps. But I've always found it kind of necessary to hang on to your inches.

  10. #10
    Jim Noel's Avatar
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    I'm with Ralph. All these other methods are too time consuming. I use a square chip placed in the scene and its image measured on the ground glass. Quick, simple and easy to make and carry around.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

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