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  1. #11
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    My Eastman uses 4 1/2" square boards. I use 1/4" Baltic Birch plywood from the hobby store for my wood lens boards. I cut a 1/8" deep, 3/16" wide rabbet around the entire perimeter (film side) with the router table so the board locks nice and snug into the recess.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  2. #12

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    And people say we are not supportive or helpful.

    I make my lens boards from masonite. The plywood always warps on me no matter how or where I store the stuff, or chip on the router. Masonite does not look real pretty on the camera but it works a lot easier than the plywood.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  3. #13
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mark
    And people say we are not supportive or helpful.

    I make my lens boards from masonite. The plywood always warps on me no matter how or where I store the stuff, or chip on the router. Masonite does not look real pretty on the camera but it works a lot easier than the plywood.
    Repeat this ten times: "I will sharpen my router bits!"

    Seriously, I have a small diamond encrusted hone that I use to dress the router bits before I mount them in the tool (it looks like a nail file on steroids). That little extra step makes for much nicer cuts.

    I used to have that problem with 1/4" ply as well, tear out and chipping was a pain. It was one problem that was partially solved by pouring money at it - I bought the best router bits I couldn't afford and I make sure that I feed the work a little slower than my heavy handed router technique leads me to want to do. As for warping, if you can find 7 ply 1/4" Baltic Birch, give it a try. It tends to resist warping much better than the 5 ply stuff and is worlds apart from the 3 ply crap.

    I tried Masonite a few times, but I don't like it as it tends to swell during damp weather and the edges can get rather ratty.

    I spray my lensboards with Krylon flat black paint on both sides after I cut the mounting hole, then let them dry for a few days before mounting the lens.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  4. #14

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    I recently acquired a B&J Grover 8X10 from a friend, and acquired an original B&J lensboard from another APUG'er. After stripping the grey paint from the front, it appears to be ash in tongue n' groove pattern ( thick, light and sturdy). Only unusual feature is a 90 degree bevel on one side of back probably for ease of insertion into bottom area of standard.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  5. #15

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    DOug, Kodak has the same bevel. It fits a bevel on the front standard opening.

    Bob. It is a good thing I live in the desert. No problem with swelling masonite. As for sharpened bits. I went out and bought a new bit and it still splintered. I guess I'll have to buy a sharpener. I can hear the wife now. Not another purchase?
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  6. #16

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    Good Afternoon,

    Be sure to use tempered Masonite; it's denser and harder than the regular stuff which has a tendency to "fuzz up" on the edges. If you're worried about moisture, just use a sealer on it, especially the edges; you'll probably want to paint the back side black also.

    Konical

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