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  1. #1
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    What's in your bag? (LF)

    It's all about the prints... but I still enjoy the gear to a point. I especially enjoy reading about what others pack along with them, both camera gear and other bits. After getting some advice from Michael A Smith I added a compact mirror to use when it's difficult to access the aperture and shutter speeds on the front of my camera. This has really helped me on a number of occasions. I wonder if there is anything else I'm missing?

    (I did a reasonable search and couldn't find a thread about this for LF gear forgive me if I missed it.)

  2. #2
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    F64 Large Backpack (black)
    Toyo 45AII
    Pentax Digital Spot Meter
    Nikkor 90mm SW f4.5
    Fujinon 150mm NW f5.6
    Nikkor 210mm W f5.6
    Fujinon 300mm C f8.5 (lenses inside a Gnass Gear 4 lens case)
    Lens hoods, rubber
    Hoya HMC yellow, orange, red
    Tiffen Polarizer - step up rings
    6-12 Fidelity Elite Film Holders loaded with TMY2, HP5+ when I run out (holders in F64 film holder bags)
    Cable release
    Soft brush / lens cleaning fluid / lens cloth
    Compass / small tape measure
    Folding mirror (think women's make up) for when I can't easily access the front of the camera to change the aperture & shutter speed
    Moleskin / pen / marker / reciprocity table (Howard Bond Data)
    Most of the small bits are in an old Lowepro S&F Utility Case
    Gloves in the winter / extra socks and $1 poncho all year
    Harrison darkcloth and fold up soft white reflector
    Reis J100 tripod with double tilt head.
    Last edited by Shawn Dougherty; 11-14-2013 at 04:32 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typos

  3. #3

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    Tell me about good bags to use for LF then later i will tell you what i filled those bags with.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by TareqPhoto View Post
    Tell me about good bags to use for LF then later i will tell you what i filled those bags with.
    Bag?? I use a Kelty frame pack. It holds a Deardorff V8, four to six filmholders, a smaller bag with lenses, filters, meter, notebook, etc.; lunch, water, darkcloth, odd neccessities. The tripod can be tied to the top or bottom, usually the latter, the all-up weight is ca.45-50 lbs.

  5. #5
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    One of my most useful items are a set DIY viewfinders made from black ABS sewer pipe fittings. When combined with a black matte board cutout glued to the front openings and calibrated for each matching lens's field-of-view, they exactly match the projected image on the 8x10 ground glass, when pressed to my eye socket.

    I find that some of the most enjoyable LF photography time I spend is done before hauling out the camera, when I am just walking around looking at things. Much easier to use these guys (one for each lens I use) to do a quick ballpark assessment, then just keep walking.

    If the composition is worthy of future consideration with the actual camera, I will often mark the spot on the ground with stones, or whatever else I can find, and make a note of the location. Then I can return later when the light, time, or weather are better suited. I have even used small spray-painted crosses if I think I might need to wait months.

    Another useful item is my classic Brunton pocket transit (magnetic compass) from my long ago days working as a field geologist. I use this to record bearings of various subject matter if I feel the direction of light might be better during a different time or season of the year.

    I have used such readings in the past together with various software applications (planetarium programs, Photographer's Ephemeris, etc.) to carefully narrow down dates and specific times when it might be better to return. Don't want to take a day off work and drive 200 miles in March when August would have been a better choice.

    That was the case with this photograph, when, to get the glancing sunlight as I wanted it, I measured the orientation of the wall with the Brunton, then waited almost nine months to return on a specific day and at a specific hour of the morning.

    And a third really useful item that I, and a lot of others, carry is a small battery-operated voice recorder for notes. The saved information density is much greater than with written notes. And I can use it in the dark when necessary. This is especially useful to me when, as described above, I am just walking around looking.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #6
    Shawn Dougherty's Avatar
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    Whoa. Good stuff, Ken. That compass is bitchin'. I love that it has a tripod mount. =) Also enjoyed the picture you linked to, it's definitely all about the light!

  7. #7
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Dougherty View Post
    That compass is bitchin'. I love that it has a tripod mount. =)
    Yeah, the rule of thumb was that when hand holding a Brunton, you should be able to read it accurately to within 1/2 of a degree. It's magnetically damped, so if your technique is good that's not too hard.

    But if it was tripod-mounted or used on a plane-table for precision work (which also automatically held it perfectly level), one should be able to read it down to 1/5 of a degree. That's about the limit of accuracy for setting the regional magnetic declination offset as well.

    Not sure what the inflation calculators say, but I'm looking right now at the original Brunton box it came in on the book shelf above me, and the original price sticker on it says $150.30. That would have been around 1982-83.

    It's quite a beautiful precision instrument.



    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  8. #8
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    The bag depends on the camera of course, but for small stuff (5x7/5x12) I have a Zone VI "cooler" white bag that can hold the Canham 5x7, several lenses, my Minolta Spotmeter F, cable release, and a half-dozen or more holders. If I'm packing the 5x12, the bag holds the camera plus five holders, and a second canvas Whole Foods grocery tote has the meter, lenses, cable release and Sawtooth Designs darkcloth. If i'm feeling particularly gutsy/insane, there's a Tenba shipping bag that hauls around the 14x17 plus the Saitta bag for the 5 14x17 holders. The canvas tote makes another appearance with that outfit hauling the two lenses, cable release, and meter.

  9. #9
    ROL
    ROL is offline
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    Headlamp, matches, compass, toilet paper, Polish bivouac bag (XXL garbage bag), 6 year old PowerBar (gotta replace that) – along with the less important camera stuff.

  10. #10
    Black Dog's Avatar
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    Flapjacks and Green n Blacks choc bars are most excellent ROL
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

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