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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by jamie young View Post
    I'm with Dan Fromm
    I think it looks like a late model cycle graphic. The cycle graphic was the precursor to the crown and speed models.
    I think I was mistaken. Charles quoted the book correctly. As Ian Grant pointed out, the OP's camera isn't much like a Cycle Graphic. If you look at the picture I gave a link for, you'll see that the Cycle Graphic has triple extension, with screws sticking up from the bed to lock the bed sections. The OP's camera doesn't have these screws. The front standards aren't that much alike, either. And the Cycle doesn't have cut-outs in the sides for the focusing knobs, as the OP's camera does.

    It isn't likely, but the OP may have misread the s/n. I looked in the neighborhood of 56,981. The last Cycle Graphics before it are 56,566 - 56,715 and the first after are 76,850 - 76,924.

  2. #22
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    jamie young,
    go to http://www.graflex.org/helpboard/ and dig to confirm that although Folmer and Schwing serial numbered their cameras from the beginning they kept no record until after being purchased by Eastman Kodak. Sometime after being purchased by Kodak Mr. Folmer or Mr. Schwing went out and purchased a single entry ledger commonly used in accounting. In this book was listed a job number, quantity, camera type, beginning serial number, ending serial number. This continued until July 1922 when the date the entry was made in the book was added. This book was used until 1962. The last administrator of the Graflex Corp. took the book with him when the company came to an end in 1973. The book was scanned and copies given to a handful of trusted people. One of those persons gave Dan and myself a copy of their copy. Several pages from the beginning of the book are missing, reason unknown but speculated to be wear and tear.
    The serial number list linked to in Kawaiithulhu's post was compiled and shared by me from serial number posts on graflex.org help board before the book copy was made available to me. The only other information that will exceed the book will be the original sales receipt with the camera serial number on it.

    And before anyone asks for a copy of the book deposit $10,000,000 to my bank account and I will at least consider sending you one, but there are no guarantees I will.

  3. #23
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    We now only really know about the obvious special order Graflex cameras (Police, Prison, Military etc) some of which were assembled in third party workshops from parts supplied by Graflex.

    There were less common special order cameras, I have a custom made pre-Anniversary WA Speed Graphic that was clearly made that way rather than converted later.

    There's also very little known about Graflex's secretive links with the British company MPP after WWII. MPP's Micro Press is essentially Speed Graphic parts in a Celestion made casing. MPP the camera manufacturer & Celestion the speaker manufacturers were owned by the same person.

    Ian

  4. #24
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shutterfinger View Post
    That serial number is listed as a Spec. 3x4 Speed Graphic. Only 6 were made on the job number. No way to tell the date but possibly 1912-1918 range.
    The hardware finish is .00005 silver plating on brass. Any attempt to clean with metal polish of any kind will remove the silver.
    Maybe Walter should double check the format. The possible 1912-1918 date matches the style of Speed Graphic and the small batch size would seem to indicate a special order. You have the book so does the term "Spec." have any significance in this case ?

    Ian

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Maybe Walter should double check the format. The possible 1912-1918 date matches the style of Speed Graphic and the small batch size would seem to indicate a special order. You have the book so does the term "Spec." have any significance in this case ?

    Ian
    It is an abbreviation for special. Turns up from time to time in the book. What makes the camera(s) special isn't spelled out. The book is very terse.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    It is an abbreviation for special. Turns up from time to time in the book. What makes the camera(s) special isn't spelled out. The book is very terse.
    Thanks Dan, I assumed that was probably the case but wanted it clarified.

    So we a have a camera here that's non standard and an entry for the same serial number that's one of six "special" as in non Standard Speed Graphics. Maybe more than a co-incidence

    Then a non standard camera from Speed Graphic parts *except for the shutter) which isn't in any of the Graflex catalogues so has no model name could well be a Spec. Speed graphic.

    Ian

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