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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl A View Post
    Fair enough, I will only add that it is difficult to do contact prints on variable contrast paper without an enlarger. I have tried. You will benefit from using contact paper to do it without an enlarger.
    Gosh, I do it all the time. I built a little light box to restrict the light levels and provide someplace to put a filter; but when I say "I built", I actually mean "I cut two holes in a cardboard box and duct-taped a light fixture to the bigger one".

    Low technology is still the best technology! :-)

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    If you had a few more dollars and lived half-way around the world, this looks to be a decent deal: http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/va...230551275.html

    8x10 camera with two lenses - $900 (Commercial Dr.)




    I am letting go of my 8x10 camera system. When I first got it, I planned to do a lot more work with it than I actually ever did and now it's pretty much just collecting dust. I would like it to go to a better home, where it will get used!

    Included in the price is the following:

    - Tachihara 8x10 Wooden field camera
    - 360mm Calumet Caltar f/5.6, w/ 110mm UV filter
    - 14" Kodak Commercial Ektar f/6.3
    - Majestic tripod with 6"x7" plate
    - 4 "MetalMaster" film holders
    - 4 plastic film holders
    - Red, Green, Yellow and Orange 72mm filters for the Kodak lens
    - POWERFIST bullet level
    - Loupe
    - Bi-Post to PC Sync cable for the Kodak lens
    - Shutter Release cable (only works with the Calumet lens)
    - Retractable measuring tape
    - Open package of 8x10 negative holders

    Not shown in the pictures, but included is a rotary development film base, along with three film tanks - two which will hold two 8x10 negatives each, and one which holds just one 8x10 negative.

    The camera works great - I even used it last month, but that was the first time in a year or so.

    The price for this package is more than fair. Price is Firm.
    I understand that you were just linking, but sometimes what seems undo able can be achieved. I have a friend in Vancouver who I could ask too I it up for 900 and I could pay him slowly. Not saying for this listing but just giving you guys a sense of what sometimes looks to be impossible is quite doable because of certain things.

    Cheers

    Raffay


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Raffay, you need: Lens, camera, at least one filmholder, camera support, film and a place to process it.

    $300 will get you (with luck) a camera or a lens.
    But here's what you could do - get a lens, and then get an 8x10 GG back. Make two boxes of 1/4" plywood so one slides into the other - mount the GG back on the bigger box, the lens on the box which slides inside, use some velvet to keep the light outside and/or make some baffles. You now have a focuseable boxcamera, put four rubber pads on it (like an old Deardorff V8) and a table can be the support.
    I was actually hoping someone would say this. I was thinking of buying a Deardorff back and then go from there. I have one question, is it possible to collect one part at a time and as you mentioned get a lens then the back and so on. Is it possible to complete a camera like that with original parts as and when they come along. In the mean time just continue with whatever we have.

    Cheers

    Raffay


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  4. #24
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Well, it would almost have to be possible, huh? Just purchase what you can, put it in that box in the dark corner of the closet and then add to it as you go until you have all you need.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
    APUG BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE
    DE Darkroom

    "Wubba, wubba, wubba. Bing, bang, bong. Yuck, yuck, yuck and a fiddle-dee-dee." - The Yeti

  5. #25

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    Start with pinhole until you can put together a full setup. Believe me, you can make real art with pinhole photography as well as learn the basics of LF processing.

    Good deals come up on Ebay but they are more limited these days. And the restrictions on foreign shipping often kill a great deal. Find an American photo friend and get yourself some deals.

    tim in san jose
    Where ever you are, there you be.

  6. #26
    polyglot's Avatar
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    As I recall, you haven't been shooting the 4x5 very long, maybe a year? Is there any particular reason you want to start with 8x10 already? I would suggest that you probably want to spend a whole bunch more time (and film) on practising to use the 4x5 and getting the absolute most possible out of that format before diving into 8x10.

    8x10 is expensive, just the film, and that's without even worrying about camera costs.

    Anyway to answer your question as-asked rather than what I think is a good idea:
    - get a cheap lens that covers 8x10 like a 240 or 300 Symmar-S; it should be under $250 if you're patient
    - make a sliding-box camera; you can light-seal it with felt or velvet
    - make or buy ($100?) a film holder
    - buy a box of x-ray film (super cheap!)
    - get to it!

    That will get you 8x10 but at IMHO no benefit over a decent 4x5 system other than larger contact prints. You won't have movements and you may not have accurate focusing and you sure can't afford one of the fancy soft-focus lenses (Verito, P&S, etc) that are one of the few purposes for which 4x5 is not sufficient.

    If you have no enlarger and want into 8x10 in order to get bigger (contact) prints, I would suggest that you are much better off buying (or building if shipping is a problem) a 4x5 enlarger. I paid $150 for my DeVere 504 and $80 for the EL-Nikkor in it. Shipping will be horrible for you, but you might be able to buy just the enlarger head (bulb, mixer, bellows and lens) and rig up your own frame for it to support it above the paper and avoid shipping the huge+expensive enlarger frame. See some pictures of the Beseler 45MX for inspiration on the framework.

    Edit: I also recall that you were struggling to get enough light for your 4x5 portraits. 8x10 makes it four times (two stops) worse! Unless you've solved your lighting situation, I think you would make far more improvement in your images from buying lights than any other camera-related equipment.
    Last edited by polyglot; 12-10-2013 at 05:42 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27

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    It sometimes seems as if existing 8x10 shooters positively discourage others from trying 8x10.

    Not everybody's motives, interests or priorities are the same.

  8. #28
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    It sometimes seems as if existing 8x10 shooters positively discourage others from trying 8x10.

    Not everybody's motives, interests or priorities are the same.
    If you're referring to me, I'm not an 8x10 shooter. 6x7 and 4x5". I'm just trying to inject some realism into the debate with regards to the stated budget and how it might best be used to improve the images one can take.

    Consider this: the OP's whole budget will buy about 50 sheets of HP5 shipped from B&H, far less in anything from Kodak. And that's without a camera to put it in or lens to expose it with!

  9. #29

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    Fair enough. I was referring to your post in this instance as a specific example of something I see as not uncommon, but I made an unwarranted assumption about your using 8x10. My apologies.
    I'll stand by the general drift of my post though, which is that my overall impression is that people new to a format (or indeed to film) seem often to be told what they "should" be doing.
    But that discussion is probably for an ethics or lounge thread, and I don't want to trigger a wildly off-topic shift for this thread

  10. #30

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    The OP is planning to use X-ray film which is easily available in Pakistan, as he posted elsewhere.

    I generally like to give people the benefit of the doubt that they know what they want to do, and unless they are asking for advice about what to do I assume they have considered the pros and cons of it. Here we have someone asking how to do something, not whether they should or not.

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