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Thread: 4x5 devoloping

  1. #11
    kintatsu's Avatar
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    I've been developing my 4x5 b$w in the bathroom. I have a tiny bathroom with no windows, so I just use the toilet back as a bench and the sink to hold the water stop tray. Glad makes their Christmas storage in just the right size. I can even do 5x7 prints with some small room in the same "tray." They also last forever. 3 of those, a metronome app or website set to 60BPM, and a timer set outside the door and you're off to the races!

  2. #12
    smithdoor's Avatar
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    Nov 2013
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    Does take a lot
    ever thing you need cost under $75.00 see list below
    I use used bottles 1/2 gal free

    Good luck
    Dave

    Yankee Adjustable 4x5 Cut film Developing Tank
    Model #4945
    $29.99 $29.99

    LegacyPro 6 inch Glass Thermometer
    Model #62010
    $3.99 $3.99



    Arista Flow Wetting Agent 4 oz.
    Model #6170
    $4.19 $4.19

    Arista 76 Powder Film Developer to Make 1 Gallon
    Model #550110
    $5.99 $5.99

    Arista Arifix Powder Fixer to Make 1 Gallon
    Model #550225
    $4.99 $4.99

    Arista Liquid Paper Developer to Make 1 Gallon

  3. #13

    Join Date
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    You have several options:
    Jobo Expert tanks (3010 or 3006 if you also do 5X7), and if you want to spend less you can get the 2520 tank and 2509n reel (which will also enable you to process roll film). You can use a manual or motorized rollerbase, or you can roll by hand. If you want to go all in you can get a Jobo processor.
    Any choice of the above will pay for itself very quickly when you compare to the savings of sending film out, not to mention the improved quality, and most important the fun of it all. Then you can also do C41 and e6 at home with ease...

    Scanning is easy - and can good results can come from an Enpson v700. Imacon PII's are on ebay often under 2000$. If you want to do it really cheap you can get a microtek scanner for under 50$ that will do 4X5 (5700 and 5800 models), they are slow but quality is not bad, especially for the price tag.
    CatLABS of JP
    Darkroom resources and service

    www.catlabs.info | https://www.facebook.com/CatLABS.of.JP | www.jobo-usa.com

  4. #14

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    Don't worry about the spelling. In these dumbed down days, who would notice?

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Don't worry about the spelling. In these dumbed down days, who would notice?
    Besides... it's hard to have much respect for a guy who only knows one way to spell a word.

  6. #16

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    Jun 2003
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    hi dwight

    i always thought developing in trays would be prone to scratches
    i used to develop in hangers and tanks .. then got weird marks on my film
    from hangers so i went to trays .. haven't stopped .. ( never a scratch after 2000+ sheets of film )
    i sometimes do a mix of 40 sheets of 4x5 and 5x7
    as long as you learn how to shuffle them and separate the sheets it really isn't a problem ...
    separating the sheets in a prewet/water bath
    is probably the hardest part of the operation .. ( it can be a PITA )
    if you have 3 large tupperware containers ( dollar store sells them cheap! ) you can use hangers and tanks
    its not hard either, as long as your hangers don't mark your film, and if they do, you eliminate the bad one/s ...

    good luck !
    john
    ask me how ..

  7. #17

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    I just tried the Taco method for the first time, can't say I loved it. Maybe the hair bands I used were too small or something, but I had a hard time getting 4 sheets into the tank. Right now I'm thinking about either a mod54 and a 3 reel Paterson tank, or give the Yankee a go.

    On the plus side, it was the first time I ever developed film, my chemistry was too warm, and I made a mess of the tacos, but I still got some success, enough to spur me on and want to try again, and shoot more 4x5.

  8. #18
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegman View Post
    I just tried the Taco method for the first time, can't say I loved it. Maybe the hair bands I used were too small or something, but I had a hard time getting 4 sheets into the tank. Right now I'm thinking about either a mod54 and a 3 reel Paterson tank, or give the Yankee a go.

    On the plus side, it was the first time I ever developed film, my chemistry was too warm, and I made a mess of the tacos, but I still got some success, enough to spur me on and want to try again, and shoot more 4x5.
    The Paterson Orbital is incredibly easy to use. Loading is simply a matter of laying the film into the tray, emulsion side up. No clipping into place. No vexatious popping out of position followed by damage as you try to relocate the film back into the slot... The Paterson Orbital gives you all the advantages of tray development with the added advantages of a daylight tank.

    RR

  9. #19
    Light Guru's Avatar
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Regular Rod View Post
    The Paterson Orbital is incredibly easy to use.
    That are also hard to find and expensive when you do find them.

  10. #20
    Regular Rod's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Light Guru View Post
    That are also hard to find and expensive when you do find them.
    I think this might be a myth. I just did a search for "Paterson Orbital" on eBay and two came up. £120? Is that expensive? They save you from damaged negatives. They allow you to use stand and semi-stand agitation regimes. They can be used for 4x5, 5x7, whole-plate, and 8x10. Since I modified mine to suit film as well as paper I've been delighted with the results. Certainly paid me back handsomely...

    RR
    Last edited by Regular Rod; 12-07-2013 at 11:32 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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