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Thread: 4x5 devoloping

  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatLABS View Post
    You should look at big city CL's. I cant say how many times poeple have tried to make us take their enlargers. Not for money, just so they dont have to deal with taking it out to the dump themselves.... You should just post a wanted ad on the local freecycle or CL and see whats happens. While there are plenty of LF enlargers our there worth a 1500$ or other hefty sum investment, a first, basic 4X5 enlarger shouldent cost much. That said, they often do not include all you will need such as carriers or lenses, but its a good start. Once you decide if you want to move up then you can look at some nicer Ebay listings for nicer enlargers.


    While technically this can be done, and some might subjectively feel its an OK thing, you cannot really scan a contact and make a viable large print out of it.
    That's what I kind of assumed about scanning a print.

    I live in Amarillo, and the larger cities like Dallas (6 hr drive), OKC (5 hour drive), Albuquerque (4 hour drive), etc....see the pattern. I'm at least 250 miles from anywhere

  2. #42
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    I am also trying to figure out a good 4x5 developing workflow. I tried the taco method twice with mixed results. 6 sheets in long taco (folded on the short edge) in a 3 roll paterson tank, it was a very tight fit, and one of the rubber bands came off in development, one sheet scratched. 4 sheets in the short taco (folded on long edge) didnt want to fit in a 2 roll patterson tank, the funnel didnt want to lock down without contacting the film. So i placed them into the 3 roll. Light agitation resulted in 2 sheets scratched up again. Then I got a few plastic food container trays and did 2 sheets in them, no scratches.

    I have a plastic 4x5 yankee tank somewhere from a set of darkroom stuff I got, but I dont remember if I gave it away. I cant see myself spending $65 bucks for the mod 54, or $200 for an orbital. I will probably stick to tray developing for the time being.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    ... Then I got a few plastic food container trays and did 2 sheets in them, no scratches...
    I use the Ziploc or Glad trays and enjoy developing that way. It's, for me, easier to control things and to achieve the agitation scheme that fits my methods.

  4. #44

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    My sheet film developing history went like this.

    Chapter 1, trays. Could not get the hang of shuffling negatives without scratching or defects. I know that some people do it this way for decades, and maybe for the larger formats it gets easier, but not for me with 4x5.

    Chapter 2, tubes. I made some individual tubes, a la BTZS, from black pvc pipe and caps available at Home Depot. This worked great. Very consistant, easy to control the process with a water bath, but could only do a couple at a time. More than that and I felt like that plate spinner Ed Sullivan used to have on his show.

    Chapter 3, Jobo Tank. I picked up a tank and reel and tried doing the manual inversion on a large scale. While that works it does consume a lot of chemistry. I located a Beseler tube roller base and modified it to hold the tank by the magnet on the bottom. I'd clamp this to the counter with a quick clamp to keep it from tipping. This worked great! With this setup and a used densititometer I finally had the consistancy needed to calibrate my film process from beginning to end.

    Chapter 4, CPE2+. I found a Jobo processor for cheap and haven't looked back. While chapter 3 was satisfactory, with the processor I got additional tanks and reels and increased my film developing capacity. This has also given me the confidence to try home developing E6 with pleasing results.

    Chapter 5, TBD. What comes next? I've considered an additional JOBO, one for color and one for BW. Or a larger heavier duty unit and reserve the CPE for a backup. The problem is that the price of Jobo tanks and reels have gone from high to stupid. It would be hard for me to rationalize buying new at current prices. I think the reality is I now have what I need on the film developing side and need to look into improving skills in composition.

  5. #45

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    I've used three methods in recent years and there are pro's and cons to each.

    The Yankee tank is really consistent and easy to use, but it needs a vast amount of developer, not a problem if its full of film, but only two sheets makes it absurd to use. As somebody has mentioned, hold the lid down when you are agitating as the wave can lift it off.

    The MOD54, I have the Mk1 version, the Mk2 may be better. But I always had some sort of problem, I'd solve one thing and a new one would crop up. Careful agitation would still result in sheets moving and jumping slots, there were steaks from localised swirl, and the sharp edges can scratch film. It was a big experiment each time I used it.

    The Paterson Orbital. This is by far the best in terms of even development, very small volumes of chemicals are needed, ease of loading, freedom from marks on the emulsion, and efficient agitation. The only downside I find is that it can leak light slightly if a bright light is near the drain corner, not a direct leak, probably reflected light bouncing around corners. Ordinary room lighting or a dull day and its fine. Only four 4x5's at a time though.

    Steve
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  6. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    The Paterson Orbital. This is by far the best in terms of even development, very small volumes of chemicals are needed, ease of loading, freedom from marks on the emulsion, and efficient agitation. The only downside I find is that it can leak light slightly if a bright light is near the drain corner, not a direct leak, probably reflected light bouncing around corners. Ordinary room lighting or a dull day and its fine. Only four 4x5's at a time though.

    Steve
    I guess its time for you too to try Jobo tanks and reels, or better yet and expert drum.
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  7. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by CatLABS View Post
    I guess its time for you too to try Jobo tanks and reels, or better yet and expert drum.
    I have thought about it, but not sure why 'its time', could you elaborate? How much developer do they need for four sheets of 4x5? Yes I know, some developers are cheap, but some aren't, and the other advantage if 'less' is the time it takes to get everything up to temperature and the volume of water used for the wash. 500ml or less, like the Paterson Orbital uses, and I'd be very interested in the Jobo drum. But come to think of it I'm not having any problems with the Paterson Orbital, but I guess as a fully paid up member of the 'there is more than one way to crack a nut' club its the 'time' thing that intrigues me, what have I missed that makes the Jobo so much more compelling?

    Steve
    Last edited by 250swb; 12-31-2013 at 02:51 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

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    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  8. #48
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    How does one do stand development with Jobo tanks and reels or expert drums? I can see the advantages for colour work but what about monochrome?

    RR

  9. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by 250swb View Post
    I have thought about it, but not sure why 'its time', could you elaborate? How much developer do they need for four sheets of 4x5? Yes I know, some developers are cheap, but some aren't, and the other advantage if 'less' is the time it takes to get everything up to temperature and the volume of water used for the wash. 500ml or less, like the Paterson Orbital uses, and I'd be very interested in the Jobo drum. But come to think of it I'm not having any problems with the Paterson Orbital, but I guess as a fully paid up member of the 'there is more than one way to crack a nut' club its the 'time' thing that intrigues me, what have I missed that makes the Jobo so much more compelling?

    Steve
    Well, here are some notions:
    1. The Jobo 2520+2509n reel requires a minimum of 270ml for 6 sheets not 4 (Generally less expensive then the orbital)
    BTW - ***the 2550 tank with 2X 2509 reels will process 12 sheets, with a minimum required 640ml....
    2. Expert drum 3010 requires a min of 330ml for 10 sheets (though you might want use the min chem/sq inch as needed, in most cases at least 500ml, but thats for 10 sheets), generally more expensive then the orbital.
    3. Results will surpass anything you know in terms of quality and evenness, or any other term really.
    4. NO LIGHT LEAKS - ever, in fact, no leaks of any kind for that matter....
    5. For some this might be important: Jobo gear is currently being made and so spare parts or replacement reels etc. are readily available.

    Some food for thought
    CatLABS of JP
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  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Regular Rod View Post
    How does one do stand development with Jobo tanks and reels or expert drums? I can see the advantages for colour work but what about monochrome?

    RR
    You are not suggesting that stand developing is the only way to process BW films...?

    However question this has already been discussed multiple times, in various threads you yourself were posting in...
    CatLABS of JP
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    www.catlabs.info | https://www.facebook.com/CatLABS.of.JP | www.jobo-usa.com

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