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  1. #11
    David Brown's Avatar
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    I think "geeking the details" is the best description of many large format shooters that I've ever read ...

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Brown View Post
    I think "geeking the details" is the best description of many large format shooters that I've ever read ...
    Yes! a view camera particularly a monorail with all conceivable moves is surely a trap for the obsessive compulsive and anal compulsive types.
    But, did you know that a "geek" is properly a circus sideshow freak, specialising in biting the heads off critters like snakes and chickens?

  3. #13

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    In 4x5, I'd far rather carry my Sinar Norma monorail than any folder. It's faster to use and can handle just about anything bellows-wise, or with
    respect to extreme focal lengths. But for airline travel or long-haul backpacking, it's just too bulky. That's why I also own a petite little Ebony
    folder. But in 8x10, I only use a Phillips folder, simply because nearly all my shooting in this format involves dayhiking with a pack, and a monorail
    that large would be rather cumbersome.

  4. #14

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    I never use extreme movements on the Toyo, just a little tweak here and there. Its nice to have the option, but a pain in the butt to drag around. By geeking the details I mean agonizing over all the specs when they really won't matter. Thanks for all the input.

  5. #15

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    I just realized that I missed the key part of the discussion, but it's related anyway. My preferred Sinar system, in all its flavors, has wonderful
    movements of all kinds, and therefore I use them when they're there and convenient. With my other view cameras - still gotta make them do
    the job, even with less features. When you're basically retirement age, and still trying to take a two or three week backpack tips in steep mountain terrain, that damn pack just seems to get a little heavier each year for some unexplained reason, so a simplified smaller view camera system just makes sense.

  6. #16

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    I can only recall hitting the limits on movements once. This was a 90mm on a 5x4 Wista picturing a crane, where I was backed right up to a fence. I just had enough rise, but the bellows was protesting a bit... Now the MPP technical just wouldn't have had the movements at that focal length. This was exceptional, though.

    I have 'failed' some shots by not being thorough enough when using movements - being too fixated on fixing the problem area and not paying enough attention to where the plane of focus would intersect elsewhere.

    If I am out with a rigid body camera I find I limit myself to what is possible within that constraint. With a flexible body camera I tend to look for things where movements make a possible image, and ignore the straight-on approach. I think I need to get over that 8-)
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  7. #17
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    My 4x5 that I made most of my early work on does not have indents (Gowland PocketView), so basically I was using all the movements for every image -- some of the movements just happened to be set in the 'neutral' position.

    So now I consider that I use movements in every image I make -- it is just some of the movements are in the neutral, or zeroed position.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  8. #18

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    The only time you twist the camera like a pretzal is when you take digital images of it so you can sell the thing on Ebay.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    The only time you twist the camera like a pretzal is when you take digital images of it so you can sell the thing on Ebay.
    They took pictures like that on film, too, way back when and put them in things called "catalogs".

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    They took pictures like that on film, too, way back when and put them in things called "catalogs".
    I remember seeing those images years ago in the photo magazines and wondering how anyone could learn to use something like that.

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