Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,935   Posts: 1,585,613   Online: 699
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23
  1. #11
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,765
    Images
    40
    For a couple decades or so I stuck with 'normal' lenses as I moved up in format. Once settled in with 8x10 and the 12" (300mm), I eventually went longer (19"). I went up to 24", but rarely use it...don't even carry it in my pack. In fact, I rarely carry the 19" these days as I have put it on another lensboard for the 11x14.

    Going the other way, I found a 6.25" (159mm) at a good price, but moved up to a 8.25" (210mm) as the widest I used for a long while. It is a Wollensak Graphic Raptar -- nice lightweight barrel lens that I did not even notice in my pack, weight-wise. I am now carrying a Fuji 250mm/6.7 as my widest...mostly due to it being in a shutter. But I can throw the 210mm into the pack if I know I will be working in tight (and low-light) quarters such as in Fern Canyon.

    But to answer your question, if I just had the 300mm and was going to get one more lens, I would still go up to the 19" first -- and then look for a 210mm in a shutter as my third lens. Before getting my own 8x10, a friend loaned me his 8x10 Deardorff with a 210 Schneider Angulon. It was not until a long time after that I came to realize what a fine lens that was.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    3
    Thanks to all. Great info to consider.

    I have been working with my LF 100-240 lenses for quite some time, with long breaks to do 8x10 wet plate portraits. As I'm now getting ready to add a LF lens to my bag, I'm leaning towards going longer for additional options with portrait work. I make all my wet plate equipment, so I tend to be very conservative on purchases. My work is all creative so I really like to maximize movement and DoF options even though there is a price to pay in sharpness. A trade off I can deal with do to required acceptance of the nature of wet place process artifacts (mistakes in other forms of photography) that regular occur due to emulsion and other anomalies that can occur. When you get faster than f8 at 90mm and below these days things can get pricey as can a good longer lens. So I'll keep my eyes open for a longer lens deal.

    For or those working with over 300mm at 4x5, is there a length or speed you would not want to go to for portrait work?

    Thanks again for the thoughtful insight.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,820
    I've never even owned a "normal" for either my 4x5 or 8x10. Generally I go either longer or much longer, and only once in awhile, shorter. It
    all depends on the individual. But I probably will never own a "normal" view camera lens.

  4. #14
    StoneNYC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    8,011
    Images
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I've never even owned a "normal" for either my 4x5 or 8x10. Generally I go either longer or much longer, and only once in awhile, shorter. It
    all depends on the individual. But I probably will never own a "normal" view camera lens.
    Compensating for something?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  5. #15
    Vaughn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Humboldt Co.
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    4,765
    Images
    40
    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    Compensating for something?
    probably -- for being in mountains instead of molehills...
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    St. Louis, Mo.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,014
    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I've never even owned a "normal" for either my 4x5 or 8x10. Generally I go either longer or much longer, and only once in awhile, shorter. It
    all depends on the individual. But I probably will never own a "normal" view camera lens.
    Back when I shot a 35mm Contax I owned 5 lenses (25, 35, 50, 100, 180). Probably 90% of my shots or more were shot with either the 25 or 100.

    When digital arrived and film camera prices dropped, I started shooting medium format and eventually large format. For some reason I now lean more towards the normal perspective. I don't know why and I don't know if it's going to stay that way or change. I don't worry about it and just shoot what works for me.

    It's just like you said, Drew. It all depends on the individual.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    2,820
    Unless I'm in a confined space, I almost always take to a narrow perspective. I have a friend who often backpacks with me, who consistently gravitates toward either wide or very wide lenses, while I never even carry a wide-angle or normal lens in the mtns. This past Sept, I happened to stumble out of a willow thicket onto an old abandoned trail in the upper Kings Can country, and pretty soon arrived at exactly the same point where AA took a famous landscape shot across a lake back in his relative youth. I looked at that scene, which was indeed lovely, but saw nothing in it for myself, but set up my tripod at the same spot, aimed it a completely different direction with a long lens, and picked out some absolutely delicious intricate details on a distant peak face. Oddly, even though this spot once had a popular trail, I've never seen a picture by anyone of what seemed to me to be a ridiculously obvious
    subject. That just goes to show how different we all are, and why we have somewhat different equipment needs. ... I don't know about Stone, but I guess
    if he lugged his gear down to the bottom of the Grand Can and back, there's hope even for him... Of course, he could always come out here and see some
    REAL canyons twice as deep, and we'll see how he holds up.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    26
    I started in LF landscape with a 150mm lens. Over a couple of years I began to favour the perspective of the 210mm and pretty much use it as my "standard" lens. A 90mm Grandagon and 400mm Apo tele Xenar fulfil my needs for both wider and longer

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    16,887
    "normal" is whatever you are shooting at the time it means nothing
    when it comes to focal length

    favored focal length all depends on what the point of your photography is.
    there are plenty of reasons to shoot head + shoulders
    as there are to shoot wide and environmental as there is to
    shoot as the eye sees
    and the same can be said for landscapes ...

    over the years i have migrated back to the center
    after wasting my time at both ends ...
    but at the same time there are always exceptions ..
    sometimes you want something far away to seem near
    as you do with a portrait that might be different.

  10. #20
    DanielStone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,049
    Images
    1
    I use most of my lenses on my 5x7(formerly both 4x5 and 8x10, now just 5x7) kit about the same amount of the time.

    I kept most of my lenses, traded a few(and have done a good bit of buying/selling whilst figuring out what I like(they're all about the same really, mfg's that is, if of the same vintage)

    However, the lens that has given me the most "winners" has been my 180A Fujinon, which is a wide(ish) lens for 5x7. I use it for close-up shooting, and it's been the #1 lens I've used while traveling here in Australia the past month or so. About 75% of my shots have been with this single lens. Great for close-ups and "macro" work(usually in the 1:3-1:1 ratio). But TBH, my 450C Fujinon also gives me that bit of extra reach I so much adore.

    Own the tools that allow you to work unhindered, and will not leave you feeling like "what should I use". Be able to determine what you NEED(not just what you want) before you even set up the camera. Let your brain determine the FL you'll need. I would love to have a lens longer than my 450C for use with 5x7, however only having ~23" of bellows won't allow me to use a 600mm lens(and I don't want a tophat board). So I just crop in post(or shoot 4x5). Not hard, and the quality is still there(just not as good as a well shot 5x7 !)

    cheers,
    Dan

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin