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  1. #1
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Kodak TMAX packaging

    A couple of quick questions for our friends that buy and use boxes of TMAX-400 in 100 sheets - Does Kodak divide the contents up in to smaller sealed packs ?
    If so, are these packs hermetically sealed ?

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    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    A couple of quick questions for our friends that buy and use boxes of TMAX-400 in 100 sheets - Does Kodak divide the contents up in to smaller sealed packs ?
    If so, are these packs hermetically sealed ?
    Yes, 2 packs of 25 in paper packs with metal and plastic inner lining.

    If you look at my recent posting I am selling a "half box" one pack. If you're interested in seeing a single pack before buying a whole box.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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    Quote Originally Posted by paul_c5x4 View Post
    A couple of quick questions for our friends that buy and use boxes of TMAX-400 in 100 sheets - Does Kodak divide the contents up in to smaller sealed packs ?
    If so, are these packs hermetically sealed ?
    hi paul,
    unless kodak alaris went back to the olden days of film packaging
    or you are buying expired film ... it doesn't come in 100 sheet / box
    you are stuck with 50 sheet boxes ...
    they haven't had 100 sheet boxes in a few years ..

    john
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    Those inner envelopes are sealed until the corners of the sheets of film pierce them. This happens quite regularly. Don't ever buy an open box where the inner envelopes have been exposed to light. You're quite likely to get fogged film. I'm always amazed when sellers show the inner sealed envelopes as though it's a good thing. If the box has only been opened in total darkness, this is obviously not an issue.

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    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karl View Post
    Those inner envelopes are sealed until the corners of the sheets of film pierce them. This happens quite regularly. Don't ever buy an open box where the inner envelopes have been exposed to light. You're quite likely to get fogged film. I'm always amazed when sellers show the inner sealed envelopes as though it's a good thing. If the box has only been opened in total darkness, this is obviously not an issue.
    Yes be wary of those who are not real photographers and are stupid and pull out the packs. Mine were never exposed to light (hence why my ad only has a picture of the box) lol

    But either way, the packs are sealed from moisture, unlike the ilford packs that are only folded over. Fuji also seals theirs.

    This is why ilford recommends that you allow the film to thaw for 2 whole days out of the fridge instead of just a few hours.

    But I've never had a problem with any ilford/Fuji/kodak films coming out of the freezer and then thawing out a few hours and loading the film, but I try really hard to give them time overnight in the fridge first if I didn't plan ahead and thaw them properly over a few days.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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    Actually, I never put Ilford film in the fridge or freezer for the exact reason you mention. Ilford film in general, as much as I do love it, seems to have more issues with humidity related emulsion problems than Kodak film. Both kinds of packaging have their pros and cons.

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    i never put any film in the fridge/freezer.
    causes more trouble than its worth.
    ive only been shooting sheets + rolls of film, all expired
    all shelf stored iso 400 + 100, 800, color, b/w slide for 13+ years
    doesn't exhibit any fog or shift at all ...
    fridge/freezer storage for short term storage is huge waste of energy.
    besides cosmic radiation will kill it no matter where it is stored
    if my apug gallery looks empty you might check these places

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    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by karl View Post
    Actually, I never put Ilford film in the fridge or freezer for the exact reason you mention. Ilford film in general, as much as I do love it, seems to have more issues with humidity related emulsion problems than Kodak film. Both kinds of packaging have their pros and cons.
    Good to know, I kind of have a system though which seems to prevent most of any issue, all of my boxes go in individual Ziploc bags, they are special industrial food safe Ziploc bags not the regular kind you would buy at Stop & Shop, I then put them into snapware which are a new brand of sort of Tupperware but have locking latches they go around the top part of the lid and a very good rubber seal, there seem to be a few knockoff brands that are similar in design, but from what I've seen the snapware seems to be of the best quality. Only then do I put them into the freezer. When I take them out of the freezer I usually put them in the fridge and let them thaw for a day before taking them out of the fridge and letting them thaw again in normal temperatures. Only then do I take them out of the containers they're in.

    This seems to alleviate any moisture issues, and I've switched to only ilford films for B&W so I've had a few boxes to through so far with no issue.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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    If they're zip locked and sealed in containers, why do you put them in the fridge to thaw ? Why not just leave them on the counter ? seem alike a lot of bother just to warm up film. It's just film. ymmv

    Like jnanian, just about all my film is neither frozen or fridged. it's kept in a cool basement fwiw
    Last edited by canuhead; 05-19-2014 at 03:08 PM. Click to view previous post history.

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    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by canuhead View Post
    If they're zip locked and sealed in containers, why do you put them in the fridge to thaw ? Why not just leave them on the counter ? seem alike a lot of bother jus to warm up film. It's just film. ymmv

    Like jnanian, just about all my film is neither frozen or fridged. it's kept in a cool basement fwiw
    It's better to slowly change an objects temperature, so many variables to list, but anything can happen in a rushed thaw. If water particles were present it could damage the film not having time for moisture to dissipate, condensation issues from moving the object too quickly to a fil different temp environment. Actual pressure issues from the high difference in temp could lead to the normally capable seal of the container to leak moisture that wouldn't happen with a slower thaw. All sorts of reasons. Plus just the change in temp could effect the emulsion by parts being colder it hotter than others could cause micro-fractures in the emulsion.

    I'm probably being overly cautious, but it's good practice to allow proper thaw time. Just like why when you defrost good you should let it sit in the fridge first so that the entire piece can acclimate without cold pockets.

    Better safe than sorry.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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