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  1. #1
    CHHAHH's Avatar
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    Pick one Symmar-S: 300mm vs 360mm

    Hi Folks!

    I use a 210mm Nikkor W on my 4x5 a lot but i am just about to get my stuff together to move to 8x10.
    Wich brings me to the obligatory annoying lens questions (i am sorry!!)

    My local 2nd hand store offers two lenses that (i think) would cover 8x10.

    - Schneider Symmar-S 300/5.6
    - Schneider Symmar-S 360/6.8 (~200€ more than the 300)

    I am not a landscape photographer by any means and i absolutely love Roversi's 8x10 work (not saying that i am somewhat close to be able to shoot stuff like that).
    60mm seems not to be a huge difference but i wonder what you guys think.

    Thanks a lot for your help!

  2. #2

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    Either one is better than none. Either one would do just fine. You'll just get more of the wheatfield and less of the barn with a 300. What they really need is a 300-360 zoom.

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Both cover 10x8 well, (a 240mm Symmar S covers 10x8).

    If you're keeping the 5x4 camera the 300mm should be useable with it, the 360mm might be too long (depends what camera you have). I bought a 300mm f9 Nikon M to use on my 5x4 while planning to move up and also shoot 10x8 - which I did quite a few years later.

    Other than that the choice is personal, what would you use most.

    Ian

  4. #4
    LJH
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    The 360mm is a massive lens; don't underestimate that.

  5. #5
    CHHAHH's Avatar
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    Thanks guys!

    For 4x5 i use a Speed Graphic but only because of the focal plane shutter. It would be nice to use the new lens with the speed graphic, but it's not a must-have.
    Maybe i get the 300mm as my first lens...and add another lens later. Or is there any special trick that makes the 360mm special?

    For portraits i think would go for half body shots as a maximum...but most of the time i do slightly wider shots..

  6. #6
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    A 300mm is considered a normal lens for 8x10, equivalent to how the eye sees the subject, or the distance between furthest corners of the frame. A 150mm is that for 4x5. Roversi work is probably shot with something longer than normal by the look of it. Thank you for introducing him to me. For 8x10 I use a 250mm, 300mm, 450mm and a 600mm. 300mm is a good place to start, but 450mm would probably be closer to the portrait work you admire.

    Many people like to stay with the same brand of lens across the range so that the "look" of the lens manufacturer is the same in all their work. My 450mm is a Nikkor 450mm M f9. Perhaps that would be something to look at. That is a popular lens and often shows up for sale here, the LF Forum or eBay.

    Here is a link to the most recent one listed on the LF Forum to give you a look at one and a pretty average price.
    http://www.largeformatphotography.in...ighlight=450mm

    You are moving up in format now. It is a slippery slope. It is not out of the question that you will at some future date move up again. The 300mm Schneider has enough coverage for limited movement on 8x10. It will not cover 11x14 or 7x17. I bought a 300mm Schneider for 8x10, but soon went to a 300mm or 12inch Dagor for the coverage needed in 7x17. To round out my list, my 600mm is a Fuji C. All three of those will cover beyond 7x17. I think up through 12x20.

    Be sure that your new camera has enough bellows length for what ever lens(es) you consider.

    Hope this helps.

    John Powers
    Last edited by jp80874; 06-03-2014 at 05:49 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  7. #7
    CHHAHH's Avatar
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    John, thank you very much for your detailed post!

    In his book "Studio" Paolo Roversi is pointing out his 12 inch Dagor lens that seems to be somewhat special to him.
    A photographer is offering me his Deardorff as he is moving away from 8x10, and i instantly fell in love with that camera.

    I will probably try the 300mm and save a few bucks compared to the 360mm... Saving money for a longer lens might be a smart move.

    Again, thanks!

  8. #8
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    CHHAHH,

    Are you familiar with the links on this page?
    www.largeformatphotography.info
    Particularly helpful relative to your initial question are the spread sheets on this page. http://www.largeformatphotography.info/lenses/

    Dagors are known for having a wonderful glow to their images and their wide coverage. They are quite a bit more expensive than the 300mm Schneider though and in most cases lack the coatings of a current Schneider.

    My shooting partner is a very happy 8x10 Deardorff shooter. He is a much younger man and can lift all that mahogany better than I.

    I will have to look for ‘book "Studio" Paolo Roversi’. Thank you for the idea.

    John
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  9. #9
    jp80874's Avatar
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    Are you familiar with the links on this page?
    www.largeformatphotography.info
    Particularly helpful relative to your initial question are the spread sheets on this page. http://www.largeformatphotography.info/lenses/

    Dagors are known for having a wonderful glow to their images and their wide coverage. They are quite a bit more expensive than the 300mm Schneider though and in most cases lack the coatings of a current Schneider.

    My shooting partner is a very happy 8x10 Deardorff shooter. He is a much younger man and can lift all that mahogany better than I.

    I will have to look for ‘book "Studio" Paolo Roversi’. Thank you for the idea.

    John

    PS
    Ouch. Abebooks shows the book for $400-$1200. I may just have to look at his images on-line. That is too close to the price of a lens.
    "If you want to be famous, you must do something more badly than anybody in the entire world." Miroslav Tichı

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by CHHAHH View Post
    Thanks guys!

    For 4x5 i use a Speed Graphic but only because of the focal plane shutter. It would be nice to use the new lens with the speed graphic, but it's not a must-have.
    Maybe i get the 300mm as my first lens...and add another lens later. Or is there any special trick that makes the 360mm special?

    For portraits i think would go for half body shots as a maximum...but most of the time i do slightly wider shots..
    Not having a Graphic and a 300 Symmar in front of me, I cannot be certain - but I sincerely doubt you'd get that lens on the front standard of a speed, even with adapters. Plus, the bellows are too short.
    I'd get the 300 Symmar, if you want a longer- but not really long lens - get a 420, 16 1/2" Artars are fairly reasonably priced but will not give you tons of movement on 8x10.I use one for portraits and such on 8x10. The Symmar will give you all the movements you're likely to need (for general use) on 8x10.
    As for Dagors, they cover quite a bit if you are contact printing - their legendary coverage is just that, a legend; if you are enlarging negatives they are a 70 degree lens just like the Symmars. A 12" Dagor is small and light, a 300 Symmar is big and heavy - and a 360 Symmar is a monster. The Deardorff V8 is lovely to use, very intuitive.
    Last edited by E. von Hoegh; 06-03-2014 at 09:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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