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  1. #1
    JackRosa's Avatar
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    Chamonix 4x5 or 8x10

    Does anyone have experience using a Chamonix 4x5 or 8x10 that would care to share your insights/impressions with me? Thanks in advance. Particularly interested in quality/rigidity/movemnets. I know it is fairly easy to use.
    Jack Rosa

  2. #2

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    I don't own either, but have seen the 8x10 up close in use. It's a handsome mid-budget practical field camera. You really need to get your hands on various camera models to decide what is best for you. Even more important, which format do you really want to shoot? Handling an 8x10 is quite a different game than shooting 4x5. What type of subject matter do you contemplate - in other words, do you gravitate mostly toward a wide-angle view, so-called "normal" range, long narrow perspectives, or all the above? This will determine what bellows you need. Do you already own lenses, and need to accommodate them, or will do that afterwards, in relation to the camera itself? Try to find some large format shooters in your own area who have things like these.

  3. #3
    Barry S's Avatar
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    I have Chamonix 4x5 and 8x10 cameras and the build quality and rigidity are top notch. They're remarkably stable for lightweight field cameras. They have extensive movements--well in excess of what most people use in the field.

  4. #4
    JackRosa's Avatar
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    Thanks Drew

    Quote Originally Posted by DREW WILEY View Post
    I don't own either, but have seen the 8x10 up close in use. It's a handsome mid-budget practical field camera. You really need to get your hands on various camera models to decide what is best for you. Even more important, which format do you really want to shoot? Handling an 8x10 is quite a different game than shooting 4x5. What type of subject matter do you contemplate - in other words, do you gravitate mostly toward a wide-angle view, so-called "normal" range, long narrow perspectives, or all the above? This will determine what bellows you need. Do you already own lenses, and need to accommodate them, or will do that afterwards, in relation to the camera itself? Try to find some large format shooters in your own area who have things like these.
    Thanks Drew. I own what is arguably the best 8x10 camera out there . . . the top of the line Ebony 8x10 (with asymmetric tilts & swings). I've been shooting 4x5 and 8x10 for a long time and have the lenses, etc. I am not shooting nearly as much as I used to because of health issues. The Ebony cameras are rock solid (and gorgeous) but heavy. It breaks my heart to have a camera that costs as much as a small car sitting there collecting dust. I have been contemplating selling it (it is in MINT condition) and buying a less expensive 8x10. This is the reason I am asking about the Chamonix cameras.
    Jack Rosa

  5. #5
    JackRosa's Avatar
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    Thanks Barry

    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    I have Chamonix 4x5 and 8x10 cameras and the build quality and rigidity are top notch. They're remarkably stable for lightweight field cameras. They have extensive movements--well in excess of what most people use in the field.
    Thanks Barry. I appreciate you taking the time to share your impressions/experience with me.
    Jack Rosa

  6. #6
    winger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry S View Post
    I have Chamonix 4x5 and 8x10 cameras and the build quality and rigidity are top notch. They're remarkably stable for lightweight field cameras. They have extensive movements--well in excess of what most people use in the field.
    I have the 4x5 F1 and +1 to Barry. I will admit having detentes would be handy for having everything lined up straight at the start, but it only takes a little more concentration to do it. I started with a Cambo monorail and was used to those. But the Chamonix has been steady, light to carry, and easy to use.

  7. #7

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    I own a Wehman and have never handled a Chamonix but I thought you might find this video interesting.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-mOwA0Xg8Q

  8. #8

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    I have a 045-N2. It is a wonderful camera. Well-made, lightweight and beautiful.

    I also have a Deardorff V8 8x10 and that thing is heavy!

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by winger View Post
    having detentes would be handy for having everything lined up straight at the start, .
    I don't want to hijack the thread, but could explain what that means? (just in case I ever win the lottery, and find myself in a position to choose between 8x10s)

  10. #10
    Barry S's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    I don't want to hijack the thread, but could explain what that means? (just in case I ever win the lottery, and find myself in a position to choose between 8x10s)
    For instance, the Chamonix front standard doesn't click into place at the zero swing and shift settings--you have to make sure it's visually aligned and then lock it down. Takes an extra moment.

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