Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,301   Posts: 1,536,122   Online: 854
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,245
    Images
    296

    Camera choice 4x5 field.

    Hello,

    I have been struggling along with my Crown Graphic for about 6 months now. It's easy to use, but is very limited in movements, specifically front standard tilt to increase depth of field. It's irritating to have to shoot at f/64 all the time, and I'm starting to look for something different.
    My dream is to get a lightweight, rock solid wooden field camera with enough movements to shoot the occasional frame of architecture as well. I absolutely do not want too vast of a plethora of movements, as I believe it will weaken the camera.
    I know what I want, but it's way too expensive. At eBay I see hundreds of view cameras pass by, but I am unsure of every single one of them. I have a budget of roughly $500 or so for the camera (not counting lens board and lens). What, in your opinion, is my best choice?

    Thank you for your time!

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  2. #2
    Mongo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    960
    I'd think a Tachihara could be found used for your price. Enough movements for landscape, and front rise for architecture...about what you're looking for. It's not the world's sturdiest camera, though. Read the review of it on the largeformat.info site for more information.

    If you can stretch your budget a bit, look into the Shen-Hao. It has all of the movements you'll ever want, and it is not weakened by the presence of those movements. More importantly, it has a Graflok back, so you can use the thicker roll-film holders easily, as well as any other accessories that fit the International standard. The Tachihara has a regular spring back, which is fine if you're using standard film holders, Grafmatics, Polaroid 545's, or an under-the-glass roll-film holder. The roll-film holders that go under the glass tend to fetch a premium price. With the Shen-Hao you also get the possibility of using a bag bellows; this might be important for short lens architecture work.

    I can tell you this about the stability of the Shen-Hao: I've mounted my Fuji 250mm on the front (a heavy lens), extended the bellows all of the way out, and shot close-ups a lot. The camera worked just fine. I've pretty much abused it for the last few years, and it still works like new. A sturdy camera with loads of movements at a great price.

    Good luck with your decision.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,245
    Images
    296
    Thanks for the tip on the Tachihara and Shen-Hao. I'll look into the Shen-Hao. First hand tips from actual users is worth so much more than any advertisement!

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4
    Mongo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    960
    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    Thanks for the tip on the Tachihara and Shen-Hao. I'll look into the Shen-Hao. First hand tips from actual users is worth so much more than any advertisement!

    - Thom
    You're very welcome. One other note: The Shen-Hao people are great to work with. If you email them, they'll get back to you quickly. They seem to want their customers to be happy...a nice touch in this day and age of reduced customer service.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    696
    Images
    21
    I've got the Tachihara and find it very suitable for the work I do (landscape with the odd [low] architectural shot). It is quite stable under normal working conditions, but I've never used anything else so I have no experience for comparison.

    The Tachi only accepts lenses to 300mm (without resorting to telephoto designs), but it's capable of holding my 75mm Schneider SA without using a recessed lensboard. It's light too, tipping the scales at about 1.4kg - great to hike with.

    Having given it a glowing review, I'd still look at getting a Shen Hao. I think you get more for your money with the Shen Hao. However, I'm happy to keep using my Tachi for next 5 years or so.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  6. #6
    Bruce Osgood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Brooklyn, N.Y. USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,429
    Images
    45
    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    Thanks for the tip on the Tachihara and Shen-Hao. I'll look into the Shen-Hao. First hand tips from actual users is worth so much more than any advertisement!

    - Thom
    There is a Shen-Hao User Group:

    http://www.phpbbforfree.com/forums/i...hp?mforum=shug

    They are very friendly and answer a lot of questions.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,645
    I bought a Shen-Hao 4X5 from Badger Graphics for a little over $600. It is a pleasure to use compared to my Crown Graphic. Looks & feels like a knock-off of an Ebony (one of our LF group members has an Ebony). I'm currently using it with 90mm, 135mm & 160mm lens, and hope to get a telephoto in the future. The 90mm Caltar lens no problems with movements. The only change I'm making to it is a Satin Snow screen, the existing one way too dim especially with the 90mm.
    Best investment I've made.
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    368
    The most important thing for you to decide is what features you need. Everyone as ther favorite camera but that may or may not meet your needs.

    Here is some reading that might be helpful

    Getting Started in Large Format

    this is available in the Free Articles section of or web site

    www.viewcamera.com


    steve simmons

  9. #9
    roteague's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Kaneohe, Hawaii
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    6,672
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by steve simmons
    The most important thing for you to decide is what features you need. Everyone as ther favorite camera but that may or may not meet your needs.
    Agreed. I would also not rule out metal field camera, there are some excellent, well built metal ones. I have a Toyo 45AII and I have found it to be an excellent one; it has even survived being dumped into the ocean on one occasion.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  10. #10
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,281
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    "Lightweight and rock solid" - sounds like Gandolfi to me. I received my old well-used 5x7" "Traditional" a few days ago, and I'm impressed. Considering that my other 5x7" is a Linhof Technika, I'm difficult to impress with solidity. But the Gandolfi IS solid. It also weights less than half of the Technika...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin