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  1. #1

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    Neutral Density Filter with B&W?

    How many of you use a neutral density filter with B&W?
    ~~~~~~
    Background: Gotten so frustrated in trying different development procedures in shooting Arista EDU 400 @ 200 (aka Foma) with a Pacemaker 4x5, in trying to 'control' this high contrasty films 'burnout' of sky, that I have actually quit shooting for a while. Love the film.. but... .. so suddenly got a thought of using a neutral density filter for the sky, and wondered if any use it for B&W.
    Thanks 4 ur replies..

  2. #2

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    An ND filter just reduces the overall exposure, it's useful to allow a larger aperture than your shutter speeds will support and so on.
    Try a yellow or light orange filter to darken the sky, and/or reduce your exposure - although I must say I have no experience with the film you are using.

  3. #3

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    Sure, comes in handy sometimes to allow longer shutter times (or smaller apertures) without changing tonal relationships.

  4. #4

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    I don't use ND filters just the yellow, orange and red filters.

    Jeff

  5. #5

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    Let me see

    Let's see if I got this right -- you are overexposing your film by one stop and are complaining about burnt-out skies. I think you should expose you film at the real ASA for starters. A yellow or red filter might help, too.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by snapguy View Post
    Let's see if I got this right -- you are overexposing your film by one stop and are complaining about burnt-out skies. I think you should expose you film at the real ASA for starters. A yellow or red filter might help, too.
    Velll u got a point dar... when I first started testing, I shot it @ 400, but not since I got the development down I like.
    Hmm will give it a new try.. and while at it... ok.. you guys I will try the yellow and red filters again... but liked the shots without them.. and my 35mm neutral density filter, held up in place fer a test...

    Ha... back in the saddle again...
    thanks guys..
    where a friend is a friend...
    (does this date me or what)

  7. #7
    wildbill's Avatar
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    sounds like you need to look into graduated neutral density filters (rectangular type). At least that's what would help in this case. I rarely use them with b+w work but they are handy to have in your kit once and a while.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by wildbill View Post
    sounds like you need to look into graduated neutral density filters (rectangular type). At least that's what would help in this case. I rarely use them with b+w work but they are handy to have in your kit once and a while.
    Yeah, the rectangular type are good. I used to use them a lot with color slide film.

    I don't know why they make the round ones. They are pretty much useless.

  9. #9
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    when I first started testing, I shot it @ 400, but not since I got the development down I like.
    Hmm will give it a new try.
    Then there is always EI320 and EI250 if you don't like EI400.

  10. #10
    Trail Images's Avatar
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    I use ND grad filters and Reverse grad filters all the time in the field. I cannot say I've done a lot of B&W shooting to date, mostly all transparency stuff. However, I would not hesitate using any of my filters to help balance the contrast or exposure latitude between light and dark with any film whatsoever.
    I find the Lee wide angle holder setup the best for my needs with a variety of brand name rectangle filters.
    "Nobody cares how much you know, until they know how much you care"

    - Theodore Roosevelt -

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