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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    Clayton,

    That wouldn't have happened to have been Adrian Engle would it?
    Dave

    I think so, I forgot his surname. Do you know him?


    Clayton

  2. #12
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Yes we are good friends and manage to take some time off each year and get into the desert, Adrian in now is the Santa Barbara area and setting up to begin printing-he moved out from the D.C. area.

  3. #13

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    A couple points:
    1. Dave and Clayton: Yes, the 11x14 shooter in question was Adrian Engle at the MammothCamera workshop in Utah.
    2. Ron and I have talked about this a good deal, and I work with this all the time as much of my work is close-up portraiture with the Polaroid 20x24.
    Something mentioned but not in detail yet, (but important) is the working distance between lens and subject. Parallax becomes a big factor. At these close working distances, the difference in distance from the lens to the eyes and the lens to say, the neck can be quite different, with reduced depth of field, out-of-focus parts of the subject behind the focus become smaller than they already are.(worse with a short lens, worse with short depth of field, etc.) If you're not careful, you're shooting a portrait of an "orange on a toothpick" to quote Mike Myers in So I Married An Axe Murderer.
    Facial features can likewise appear a bit "distorted" when shooting with a short LF lens but it's not disortion, but Parallax again.
    Cheers all,
    Tracy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    Yes we are good friends and manage to take some time off each year and get into the desert, Adrian in now is the Santa Barbara area and setting up to begin printing-he moved out from the D.C. area.

  4. #14
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
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    Hello Tracey,

    You are the man that should know.....July/August 02 View Camera article on the polaroid 20 x 24 by Peter Legrand.......he mentions using even a 210 on the format! Must be an in your face shot!?

  5. #15

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    ULF-short lenses

    It's really one of the beauties of Large Format, you can stick just about anything on the front of the bellows! I make 20"x24" Image Transfers from 35mm slides for some of my clients, we use a 50mm Apo-Rodagon, that's somewhat in excess of 20X.
    When shooting people, I tend to use the longest lens possible for any given magnification for the reasons cited in my previous post.
    Dave, Adrian thought we should be in touch with each other anyway since we're both 14x17 shooters too.
    Best,
    Tracy

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Wooten
    Hello Tracey,

    You are the man that should know.....July/August 02 View Camera article on the polaroid 20 x 24 by Peter Legrand.......he mentions using even a 210 on the format! Must be an in your face shot!?

  6. #16

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    Hi there,

    A silly thought/question:

    being that the lens/camera are much closer with the shorter lens so that the distance difference is magnified would you not get noticably more depth of field with the longer lenses farther back from the subject?

    In other words, is not using the shorter than normal lens doing the reverse of telephoto compression? not just wide angle distortion but distance expansion and requiring even more depth of field.

    Thank you.

  7. #17

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    ULF/hello

    Oh, and by the way HI CLAYTON! Good to see you posting here and there!
    Best, Tracy

    Quote Originally Posted by TracyStorer
    It's really one of the beauties of Large Format, you can stick just about anything on the front of the bellows! I make 20"x24" Image Transfers from 35mm slides for some of my clients, we use a 50mm Apo-Rodagon, that's somewhat in excess of 20X.
    When shooting people, I tend to use the longest lens possible for any given magnification for the reasons cited in my previous post.
    Dave, Adrian thought we should be in touch with each other anyway since we're both 14x17 shooters too.
    Best,
    Tracy

  8. #18
    JG Motamedi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TracyStorer
    ...If you're not careful, you're shooting a portrait of an "orange on a toothpick"...
    Thanks Tracy and all,

    Thinking about "parallax" helps me understand this much better.

    jason

  9. #19

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    20x24 portraits

    Quote Originally Posted by TracyStorer
    2. Ron and I have talked about this a good deal, and I work with this all the time as much of my work is close-up portraiture with the Polaroid 20x24.
    Something mentioned but not in detail yet, (but important) is the working distance between lens and subject. Parallax becomes a big factor. At these close working distances, the difference in distance from the lens to the eyes and the lens to say, the neck can be quite different, with reduced depth of field, out-of-focus parts of the subject behind the focus become smaller than they already are.(worse with a short lens, worse with short depth of field, etc.) If you're not careful, you're shooting a portrait of an "orange on a toothpick" to quote Mike Myers in So I Married An Axe Murderer.
    Facial features can likewise appear a bit "distorted" when shooting with a short LF lens but it's not disortion, but Parallax again.
    Cheers all,
    Tracy
    Tracy

    I had the 20x24 in the back of my mind when 1:1 or bigger (smaller?) portraits were mentioned. The mammoth camera workshop demo you did with the young girl, her face must've been nearly 3 times life size. What focal length would that have been?

    What I recall about it was lots of bellows extension and the lens a couple of feet from her face. It doesn't sound much but when I sat in the same seat to get a feel for what had just taken place it was mighty intimidating sitting in front of a giant camera and seeing nothing else!

    Clayton

  10. #20
    Ole
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    The perspective (not parallax) is determined by the position of the lens relative to the subject. The DoF is determined by the magnification ratio.

    So a 300mm lens extended to 600mm will be at 60cm from the subject (basic 1:1 rule), which is a little too close to get a nice perspective. Even if the film is 120cm away, remember that it is the lens which determines perspective! Using a 600mm lens doubles the distance, and 120cm face-lens distance gives a far better perspective. This must be weighed against the inconvenience of working at such long bellows extensions...
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

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