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  1. #11
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Stanworth
    replacing a 90mm nikkor 4.5 or f8? replacing the latter should be against the law. Massive coverage, light and the sharpest LF lens on the planet! Perez tests show this quite clearly. I would not sell mine unless I had a very very good reason. The 4.5 is a whopper and does not appeal to me as a field user. I have read too many mmixed reviews of the 80mm XL.
    Replacing the latter. I find the Nikkor 90mm F8 just too difficult to use; it is just too dark in the ground glass (I have a SatinSnow). All my lenses except this one are bright enough that I can focus with just the hood, I don't need the dark cloth. With this lens, I can't even see the image without the dark cloth.

    Given what you say about this lens, I must have a bad one, because I don't find the coverage to be that great (I have the transparencies to show it), and I don't feel (just a feeling) that it is as sharp as my 135mm Schneider.

    I have heard a number of people question the 80mm XL, but from what I have heard the problems with this lens was mainly restricted to the early models - so, I'm going to buy a new one.

    Thanks. I just wish that I had a more favorable opinion of the Nikkor, but I don't. I do see that Joe Cornish uses one a lot, so I'm sure it isn't a bad lens, but I've rarely been successful with this lens. FWIW, I primarily shoot color (Velvia).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #12

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    The extra 2 stops of illumination is very handy at times when the light is a little dim. When I was deciding which lens to go with between the Nikkor 90mm F8 and the Sch 80mm XL I thought about the lighting conditions I found myself most often shooting in. The reputation and price of the Nikkor was very tempting, but I've personally never regretted going with the Schneider.
    Last edited by John McCallum; 07-04-2005 at 09:07 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #13
    roteague's Avatar
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    Well, I got the 80mm XL in today; I also got the center filter with it. What a beautiful lens, looking forward to trying it out tomorrow.... It is way smaller than my current 90mm F8 Nikkor.

    I'm going to try it with, and without the center filter and see how the local conditions affect the resulting images. However, I think I will need to make some adjustments in how I take images; currently I use a warm-polarizing filter quite extensively. Since the center filter takes a 86mm filter on the outside, and I can't seem to find in that size. I doubt that if I could get away with a polarizer and and 81B on top.

    Any suggestions?
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  4. #14
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    At 80mm you're starting to get into the territory where a polarizer is an iffy proposition anyway. For a landscape with lots of sky, you are likely to get uneven polarization (better to use a grad in that situation). For some scenes without that much sky, the result depends on the composition, so it may not be worth the effort and cost of finding a large enough polarizer.

    If you do want to do it, though, I'd consider going to a 4" filter system.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
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  5. #15
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    At 80mm you're starting to get into the territory where a polarizer is an iffy proposition anyway. For a landscape with lots of sky, you are likely to get uneven polarization (better to use a grad in that situation). For some scenes without that much sky, the result depends on the composition, so it may not be worth the effort and cost of finding a large enough polarizer.

    If you do want to do it, though, I'd consider going to a 4" filter system.
    Valid points David. I've used the filter successfully with my 90mm, but I tend to use a lot of foreground and little sky. The primary reasons I use warm polarizers are when shooting in the late afternoon sun to enhance the warmth, while moderating the reflections on the water or when shooting in the forests (it makes the greens seem much richer).

    I priced out a complete Lee system yesterday, which I plan on ordering soon. The only thing I'm not sure about is whether to order the standard hood or the wide angle hood - it is too expensive to order both.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #16
    Baxter Bradford's Avatar
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    Robert
    Speak to Matt at Robert White. They have sourced a lens hood from B+W that will work with a polariser and not vignette with the 72XL http://www.robertwhite.co.uk/lee.htm#LabelLeeHoods. Also might want to think about which type of Pola to use. I understand that there are better ones than the Lee pola.
    Personally, I flag the lens with a darkslide, but appreciate that a hood will do a better job.

  7. #17
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Baxter Bradford
    Robert
    Speak to Matt at Robert White. They have sourced a lens hood from B+W that will work with a polariser and not vignette with the 72XL http://www.robertwhite.co.uk/lee.htm#LabelLeeHoods. Also might want to think about which type of Pola to use. I understand that there are better ones than the Lee pola.
    Personally, I flag the lens with a darkslide, but appreciate that a hood will do a better job.
    Thanks Baxter, I'll look into it. Robert White's prices are better than I can get ordering from NY (B&H).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #18

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    I have had mine for a couple of years and it is a fine lens. I would recommend buying it new. Schneider had a run with some bad cement that made the edges look very cloudy. Badger Graphics replaced mine without any grief, but if you run into that problem in a used lens, who knows.

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Tiffen makes a 4" square glass polarizer that seems reasonably priced. If I remember correctly, they call them "Tru-Pol" filters.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20

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    Good advice from David. The Lee polariser that is big enough to cover the schn center weighted filter is expensive.
    I've found the 80XL handles low angle lighting conditions at each end of the day very well without flare, but with any flat filter there is a tendency to introduce flare if shooting into the sun. Even the optical quality Lee filters and the schneider center weighted tend to have flare problems. So the Lee wide angle hood seemed to be a good option to me also, although I haven't gotten around to purchasing one yet. Did you notice they come with optional filter slots at the rear of the bellows? Very handy.
    One thing to be aware of, is the special Lee filter adaptors for wide angle lenses. They are thinner, and kind of recessed, to bring the filters closer to the lens and widen the viewing angle through the filterholder frame. Designed to reduce the possibility of vignetting.

    Congratulations!

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