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  1. #21

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    Perhaps there is a reason why there are no pictures by this guy on the galleries Jim......or maybe you are nuts...

  2. #22
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    Sorry, but I can't understand why your are so groundglass handicapped.
    Because sometimes I can't see the image in the ground glass. When I use my Schneider 135mm 5.6 lens I have no problems at all - I can even see the image without the darkcloth - but when I use my Nikkor 90mm F8, I can bareley see it with the darkcloth. Add the warm polarizing filter I sometimes use and it becomes even more difficult. But, not to worry, the 90 is getting replaced with a Scheider SuperSymar XL 80mm 4.5 next week - should be a lot brighter.
    Robert M. Teague
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    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  3. #23
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    My 2 cents worth (after 35 years' view camera work):
    I LOVE ... Beattie screens and pop-up hoods. Like "roteague", in fact even more so living in the UK with its changeable weather, I sometimes need to work fast.
    I HATE ... focusing cloths. I have one but seldom use it in the studio, since the camera screen is out of the light and I can see fine without. Outdoors a focusing cloth is a damn nuisance, particularly in hot weather or a wind, and it's one more thing to juggle with in addition to an exposure meter and film holder. I never take the cloth out of doors (if I'm using a camera without a pop-up hood, it will be a Sinar, to the back of which I can clip a spare bellows as a viewing hood).
    I PARTICULARLY HATE loupes - I just can't understand what they're for (apart from viewing processed film). People spend a lot of money on them and get a perfect sharp flat-field view of the grain of the focusing screen! The purpose of the focusing screen is to tell whether something is in focus or not - not whether it is sharp. Any good lens which is in focus and in coverage will be sharp, but you can't judge sharpness on a ground-glass screen, you need an optical bench where you can view an aerial image.

    I appreciate that for esthetic/philosophical reasons some people like to commune with their image under the dark cloth for long periods - each to his/her own, but you won't catch me doing it!

  4. #24
    Ole
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    Any screen will do with big old f:4.5 or f:3.5 lenses - sometimes I don't even use the Linhof folding hood because the image is bright enough without.

    But my 121/8 wide-angle is in a shutter which won't open up to more than f:10, and then I need a dark cloth. Even then it's way too darl in the corners, and a brighter GG would be great. Not so much for focusing as for framing. Quite often I find myself in bright sunlight with the camera, taking a picture of something in deep shade. That's when you learn to appreciate bright GG's and bright lenses.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  5. #25
    SLNestler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KenM
    Regarding the Maxwell screen, anyone have an idea of the cost?
    They finally have a website:
    http://www.mattclara.com/maxwell/index.html#Screens

    The cost of a 4X5, I believe is somewhere between $200 and $300. It would be interesting to test it side by side with the Satin Snow.
    Steven Nestler
    http://stevennestler.com

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gim
    I may be missing something here but under real low light conditions I would think a brighter GG would be a help to focus. I just order a Satinsnow GG for this purpose. Maybe I'm just nuts.

    Jim
    Of course you aren't nuts. To each his own. No disrespect intended. I found it surprising that someone presumed an individual point-of-view was an insult.

    Perhaps my expectations for a bright screen are lower than others'. I learned on dark screens. When I frame an image with, for example, a Super-Angulon 90mm I simply don't expect to see the full image at once. I can see enough of the edges, one at a time, to verify the frame and enough in general to know if I've corrected perspective.

    Let me add that some time ago I replaced the original Linhof screens with SatinSnow glass and it is an improvement, however my screens were pretty beat up.

    As time goes on, due to a worsening condition called AT, I rely more upon previewing with a separate finder, and use of the rangefinder Super Technika. Perhaps I owe an article to explain the approach, technique, rationale.

  7. #27

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    Getting a faster lens was the reason I ordered a SatinSnow. Make no sense? I got a 210mm F/5.6 Fuji and a 300mm F/5.6. On my old Ansco 8x10 both are so bright it's like watching TV. I then put the lenses on my Shen Hao and it was dark. DARK. It was one thing when my G-Clarons are dark but these things are big and heavy.

    So now I'm waiting for my new SatinSnow to replace the stock glass. BTW anybody have any tricks on removing screws? One of the screws on the 5x7 back doesn't want to come out of the wood.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    That makes no sense at all. You should know the frame. You can look outside of the camera/ground glass. Sorry, but I can't understand why your are so groundglass handicapped. Don't lay the blame on me. Look to yourself.
    JJS, I've spent more than 30 years looking through the ground glass of view cameras, as I approach the half century mark my eyes are not as good as they once were, and my need for an enhanced GG has grown in proportion to the deterioration of my eyesight. The use of a bright screen or fresnel is not a matter of one's experience or skill level. Being able to carefully study one's framing of a photograph prior to exposure is not a bad thing or a sign of inexperience.

    In regards to the various screen types, I have used Beattie screens in my view cameras for many years. However as I tend to use the Sinar zoom back with my Sinars, the added thickness of the beattie screen makes the adjustable mask for the Zoom back problematic to use. Also as I now use a 7x loupe for focusing, the fresnel lines can obfuscate detail in the image and making focusing difficult. My current thinking is to use a SatinSnow GG, which I have ordered, and when needed use the pop on fresnel made by sinar for use on their backs.

  9. #29
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    While I'd agree that many people complain about the "dark groundglass" without doing everything possible to use the groundglass they have (letting the eyes adjust to the dark, using an adequate darkcloth and a decent loupe), there is no doubt that having a bright screen makes focusing easier, quicker, and more accurate, and gives the option of using a folding hood where a darkcloth may be impractical.

    If you use a booster to meter off the glass, a brighter screen should also give more accurate readings.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Early Riser
    JJS, I've spent more than 30 years looking through the ground glass of view cameras, as I approach the half century mark my eyes are not as good as they once were, and my need for an enhanced GG has grown in proportion to the deterioration of my eyesight. The use of a bright screen or fresnel is not a matter of one's experience or skill level. Being able to carefully study one's framing of a photograph prior to exposure is not a bad thing or a sign of inexperience.
    Correct - it is merely a personal preference of some, and not for some others.

    My condolences on the old-eye syndrome. I'm only sixty years-old and have trifocals and 20/200 vision which is not to try to one-up you, but to posssibly explain why my expectations of a ground-glass are modest: it's always been difficult with dim and wide lenses, and I've adapted to work-arounds.

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