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  1. #11
    dschneller's Avatar
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    Jay/Allen, the tubes are light tight although you have to remember to close the valve and remove the right end when changing chems. I use the tubes like a reel tank, fill to completely cover the sheet film and agitate via inversion. It takes about 200ml per tube to completely cover the film.
    "...slow down and start using photography to create an image, not just capture one." b.e.wilson

    "Speed kills, Del" Johnny Fever

  2. #12

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    I use the Jobo CPP and 3010 drum for 4x5 and its great. Very easy. If you want to develop at room temperature 24C you dont really need much of a bath. All you need is a motorized base.

    If you are only doing B+W I would probably look for one of the cheaper Jobo units like a CPA or CPE with a lift, as long as the 5x7 drum will fit. I have seen the CPE at times for cheap. Also the lift makes it really easy.

    I use a Harrison 8x10 changing tent.

  3. #13
    lee
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    Allan,

    At some point ou are gonna have to have darkness, total darkness. Troy gives a good a solution with a Harrison Tent. But to load film into ANY tank you need darkness and to load film the holders from the box also requires darkness. You can use the Unicolor drum as I do and use the motor base also. you will be able to do 2 pieces of 5x7 film at one time. However, if I could afford a JOBO CPP-2 I would buy one.

    lee\c

  4. #14
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    Lee,
    I apologize - I didn't mean that I load film in the daylight or anything. But wouldn't changing chemicals while using a tube in a changing tent be a bit tough?

    I use a regular changing bag for now for working in complete darkness. I just don't see myself having the kind of room to maneuver in there, even in the tent ones. But if you think that's doable...

    allan

  5. #15

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    I will but in with some Jobo info.

    The Jobo tanks are light tight. Also IR proof if you shoot IR film.

    The nice part about that system is the lift arm option. Well worth it. You dont have to touch the drum after you start even to fill and empty it. Lift the arm and the tank empties, drop it down and pour the new chems in the chute and it runs down into the tank, while it is turning.

  6. #16

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    Allen -

    I have a changing bag, but I generally load the Unidrum in the bathroom with a towel stuffed under the door. I wait until dark, just to be sure but I don't know if it matters.
    Like the Jobo, and some of the nicer tubes, the Unidrum has a light trap so once you've got the film in the tank you don't need to open it again until the film is developed.

    If you Google for 'Unidrum 4x5' you'll find some directions on using this outfit, the only difference is that you'll get 2 sheets of 5x7 instead of 4.

    Nathan

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by kaiyen
    Lee,
    I apologize - I didn't mean that I load film in the daylight or anything. But wouldn't changing chemicals while using a tube in a changing tent be a bit tough?

    I use a regular changing bag for now for working in complete darkness. I just don't see myself having the kind of room to maneuver in there, even in the tent ones. But if you think that's doable...

    allan
    Allan, once the film(s) are in the tank, you don't have to open it to open it to pour chemicals in/out of the tank..if that is your concern. Once the film is in the tank, all you do is add your chems via some type of spout on the end of the tank (light side) and the chems are passed into the tank, tank is rotated to cover the film(s) with chemistry and then turned on end to remove the chems when time. Next goes in the stop, then fixer same way...I don't open mine until time for the wash. It really is a nice simple process, just handles a few films at a time. Of course if you purchase larger tanks (in some systems) then you get to add more films.

    Good Luck...check out the line above..it might help.
    Mike C

    Rambles

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdef

    You can use a Patterson 2-120 reel tank to develop 3x4 or 4x5 film, either singly, or up to four sheets at a time with the rubber band method.
    Jay
    Could you tell me some more about this method? Never heard of it.

    G

  9. #19

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    One more vote for the Unicolor. Check the Large Format Photography Home Page for a good article on it's use.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by nsmith01tx
    The Unidrum and Uniroller work fine and are pretty cheap. You need the 8x10 PAPER drum. It will soup 2 5x7 (or up to 4 4x5) negatives at a time. Very easy to use, and pretty thrifty with the chemicals.

    Nathan
    Nathan is right, the Unidrum works just fine. If you get an 11X14 Unidrum, you can run 4 sheets of 5X7 at once.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

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