Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,968   Posts: 1,523,397   Online: 1154
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 42
  1. #11
    marko_trebusak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Slovenia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    90
    Images
    6
    I have an Arca Swiss F-line, and when buying, I had long lenses in mind. Now that I have it and have some experience working with it in the field, I'm even more sure that I made the right decision going with monorail.

    Marko

  2. #12
    medform-norm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Netherlands
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    863
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Petronio
    I've used both monorails and folders, and prefer a technika for the sheer abuse it's clamshell will take.
    Frank, we didn't know you had a habit of abusing yor cameras. Is it something you want to talk about with us or should we seek out professional help for you?

    And, Frank, it's okay, we don't think any less of you just because of it. I'm sure it happens among the best of us.

  3. #13
    gbenaim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    403
    Images
    15

    Sinar A or F

    Thanks all for the quick response. Are there any major disadvantages to the Sinar A1 models over the F1? Thanks.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Linhof Color (not the Kardan) is compact, light and the semi-expressed body helps protect the bellows when compressed for carry - downside is that it uses the Technika lens boards which don't permit the use of large diameter lenses.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Minnesota Tropics
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    735
    Quote Originally Posted by gbenaim
    Thanks all for the quick response. Are there any major disadvantages to the Sinar A1 models over the F1? Thanks.
    If one isn't going for the standard Sinar rail, then you might look at the Sinar Alpina. Used ones are very reasonably priced, they use the Sinar boards (nice large board), and the rugged plastic bellows.

    You might want to actually handle the cameras you are considering. IMHO most studio cameras are a hassle in the field - they live best left on a tripod head. Field cameras have the ergonomics that let one manhandle them as usually happens in the field.

  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,165
    Images
    20
    Get an F-series if you go with Sinar. The A-1 uses a different rail and the standard bearers are designed for that rail. The F cameras use the same rail as the P-series and is compatible with everything else in the Sinar system, and a used F or F-1 isn't likely to be much more expensive if at all than a used A-1.

    As far as large diameter lenses on a Technika go, when there's a will...

    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Pennines
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    146
    For years I used an Arca Swiss light weight monorail in all sorts of outside places and I loved it - so easy to set up and use. Sadly it had to go. I got hold of a couple more lenses and other bits and pieces and it became a burden to carry round due to the bulk and not really the weight. I've got a 'proper' field camera now, but I do miss the simplicity of use of a lightweight monorail.

  8. #18
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Quote Originally Posted by jjstafford
    Linhof Color (not the Kardan) is compact, light and the semi-expressed body helps protect the bellows when compressed for carry - downside is that it uses the Technika lens boards which don't permit the use of large diameter lenses.
    I regularly use lenses like the 210/4.5 Xenar and 360/5.5 Tele-Xenar, both in Compound #3 shutters. This is the practical limit on a Technika board as to shutter size. For rear element size the 121/8 Super-Angulon is possible but hardly practical.

    The Linhof Color (in the unmodified version) handles a 90mm lens with very limited movements, and bellows will stratch to about 420mm - almost but not quite enough to focus the rear half of a 240/420 convertible Symmar.

    But still a range from 90 to 360mm is handled with ease, and this is as much as (or more than) most LF photographers use.

    Another nice thing is the Technika back, with GG cover and focusing hood. It makes it a lot easier to pack it in a backpack!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  9. #19
    Dave Wooten's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Vegas/mysterious mohave co. az, Big Pine Key Fla.
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    2,713
    Images
    20
    For my longer lenses for 8 x 10 I use a toyo monorail....I put in on the small 6 inch rail and the others fit nicely in a back bag....this allows me up to 1200 mm of bellows....

    I also have been testing an Orbit--B and J- 5 x 7 monorail....quite light....I am considering having a machine shop chop the rail at the smallest retracted position and threading and tapping....I paid 150 for the 5 x 7 and 500 for the 8 x 10 but use an old Omega front on the Toya 8 x 10

  10. #20
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Saint Paul, MN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,895
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by John Cook
    My favorite camera for location work (from much experience) is the Calumet/Cambo 45NX. It has all the movement and rigidity you require but is quite simple in design and reasonably light in weight. Compared to the Swiss alternatives, the price is right, as well. All in all, a nice compromise.
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Petronio
    John's comment about Cambos is true in that they are a good value. But when I was an assistant I worked for a cheapskate who had several and hated the suckers because they were loosey-goosey and I had to wedge paper into the standards to keep them from sliding down when doing any tilted shots.
    I have done quite well with my Cambo. I don't know the model number but it appears to be the same as the Calumet 45NXII. Frank, I am curious which ones you were having trouble with as perhaps there are some models that should be avoided. Either that or John and I are luckier than you were with our particular cameras. (And I am admittedly very inexperienced and may find out soon that I start having similar problems to yours!)

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin