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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    I can't resist.


    Second: Large format is 6 x 8 or bigger. 4x5 needs to be enlarged, and in that respect is like shooting your Hassie. The same pristine technique you need for the Hassie is needed for 4x5. The advantage of 4x5 over 6x6 is the size of the negative, granted, but it is irrelevant.

    You want a change, shoot 8x10. The big deal about 8x10 is that you envision the image as it will hang on the wall on the ground glass. There is a huge, and generally freeing, difference between 8x10 and 4x5 or 6x6.
    So those people enlarging 11x14 aren't shooting LF? Those people contact printing 6x6[and I mean cm] are shooting LF?

    I'd argue that the size of the negative is hardly irrelevant.

    Dodge/burn change contrast. Whatever you can do it most everything with a contact print. Likewise you can enlarge a 4x5 full frame. Or even a 6x6.

  2. #22
    Ole
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    Let's see - I now have LF cameras from 6.5x9cm to 30x40cm. I use 5x7" most of the time. Some negatives are intended for contact printing, some for enlargement. I have contact printed 6.5x9cm (and 4.5x6cm) when that has matched my vision.

    I'm not willing to concede that "LF is 6 x 8 or bigger", unless you mean centimeters.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #23

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    Sattler123,

    I just want to point out that I responded to your post in the LF forum. There was no need to get nasty...I truly have appreciated everyone's help here on APUG. My question on the LF forum was different - I was asking whether I would miss the extra movements that the Ebony SV45U2 would give me if I bought the Linhof MT 2000. I never asked that here, so no, I did not post in the LF forum b/c I was "not happy" with the responses here. Everyone here has been terrific.

  4. #24
    roteague's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    4x5 needs to be enlarged, and in that respect is like shooting your Hassie. The same pristine technique you need for the Hassie is needed for 4x5. The advantage of 4x5 over 6x6 is the size of the negative, granted, but it is irrelevant.
    I would have to disagree with you; I haven't seen too many 6x6 cameras capable of swings and tilts, which is something I do easily with my 4x5.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #25
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Do you plan to get cammed lenses, if you go with the Linhof? If not, then I would consider either going with the Ebony for more flexibility or the Linhof 2000, which doesn't have a rangefinder, but has built-in wideangle focusing. If you do want rangefinder focusing, then the Linhof is one of the few available options among new cameras.

    The movements on the Linhof are pretty good for most things, and if you really need more for something like tabletop still life work, you probably would want a monorail camera anyway.

    Asymmetric swing and tilt are nice, though, so that could be a reason to go with the Ebony. You might look at the article on asymmetric movements in _View Camera_ magazine two issues back, I think, which uses an Ebony as an example.

    Another issue--If you think you might want one of the heavier rollfilm backs, like the Linhof Super Rollex backs or one of the 6x17 backs, you might lean toward Linhof over a wooden camera for rigidity.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    [...] the Linhof 2000, which doesn't have a rangefinder, but has built-in wideangle focusing.
    That does it. I'm taking five minutes off and going into the basement with the saw to make that "wide angle" Linhof 2000 feature. There goes the strap, but what the hey, I'll save $6,000.

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    Careful with that saw, John...
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Careful with that saw, John...
    LOL! You are right. It's Friday night. We're going out to dinner where I'll probably cut my other thumb off with a steak knife.

  9. #29

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    David, yes, that is what I was thinking too (that the assymetrical swing and tilt are nice). To me, that would be the biggest reason to go with the Ebony.

    Robert, I bought Lee Frost's book on panoramic photography. It made me want to get a Fuji 617!

  10. #30
    John Bartley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by photoluver
    David, yes, that is what I was thinking too (that the assymetrical swing and tilt are nice). To me, that would be the biggest reason to go with the Ebony.

    Robert, I bought Lee Frost's book on panoramic photography. It made me want to get a Fuji 617!
    From what I've read in your posts, you already have access to a 4x5 to try? The reason I ask, is that if you don't have access to one and if you are in the Ottawa area, I have a Calumet 4x5 (monorail) setup complete that I don't use since my lust for an 8x10 was satisfied .
    If you'd like to try it for a couple of weeks. let me know. You will either have to supply your own tripod, or make do with my old Majestic that doesn't have adjustable legs (setup with it can be a challenge ).

    cheers

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