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View Poll Results: Do you take a backup shot?

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61. You may not vote on this poll
  • Always. Better be sure than sorry.

    17 27.87%
  • Depends: if the scene is unrepeatable.

    38 62.30%
  • Are you crazy? a BW 4x5" sheet costs 1 Euro (and more)!

    1 1.64%
  • Never! Backups are for sissies and it doubles the number of scenes to photograph!

    5 8.20%
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Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Backup sheets?

  1. #21
    PeterDendrinos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    Yes and no--depends on what format you shoot and film management options for different situations. In the field, if I'm hiking with 3-5 8x10" holders for the day, then I'm less likely to be shooting backups. 11x14", where the filmholders are $300 a piece, not to mention the cost of film, I'll also measure twice and cut once. 8x10" Polaroid at $9 a shot--I'll sometimes go as many as 3 sheets to get something just right, but I can usually get it in one or two.
    I agree with you completely David. My reference point is strictly 4x5 at this time. If i had to lug 11x14 film holders around i very well might think differently.

    Pete
    "…Action always generates inspiration. Inspiration seldom generates action."

    Frank Tibolt

    WWW.DENDRINOS FINE ART.COM

  2. #22
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    I do shoot backups most of the time. Most of the time this is with E-6 which I don't develop myself and the difference in the shots might be exposure time or use of a filter. I'm not good at using the ND filters yet.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  3. #23

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    I never do a second shot of an identical set-up with LF or ULF format unless something makes me suspect a problem with the first, say a sudden gust of wind during exposure that might shake the camera, or the thought that I might have been too close to the camera and the tip of my sombrero made it into the scene. I always identify each holder with N or SBR information and am confident enough with my develoment procedures that I can get a negative that will print well on the first develoment.

    However, I usually make multiple shots of any given setting with slight variations, sometimes from the same tripod spot. My theory is that if the scene looked interesting enough to pull out a ULF camera it probably deserves more visual exploration than you get with one take.

    Sandy

  4. #24
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    ... My theory is that if the scene looked interesting enough to pull out a ULF camera it probably deserves more visual exploration than you get with one take. ...
    I see a reason to get another holder... Or maybe I'll just bring another camera. That would be less expensive, I fear
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #25
    wildbill's Avatar
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    I'll do a second if i think i'll never see the same conditions again or if the light is very harsh i may change exposure for alternate development. With velvia i would love every time but it's expensive.
    On the other hand, i just did a job for Lexus with a german photographer who shot over a hundred sheets of E 100G per set up. We lit the car and he'd bracket the hell out of it then the background and then the two together. Over two nights we went through nearly 250 sheets. At the end of the night he shot about 5 sheets and some polaroids of me and the crew just for kicks.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  6. #26

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    I just returned from a place nearby featuring a nice abbey on a hill with fields and woods underneath.
    As the evening light (app. 1.30 hrs before sunset) changed dramatically after the exposure - I didn't mean to make a second - I really had to make that second shot :-)

    You see...

    G

  7. #27
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    You left out "if possible" -- I've got more than a few negatives that I couldn't have repeated two minutes later with another plate holder. But when I was shooting a portrait of my (then 99 year old) grandmother, during a move after which I was pretty sure I'd never see here again, I shot six sheets, and glad I did -- I got ONE that was spot on focus and with a good expression.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #28
    MurrayMinchin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monophoto
    ...but the situation could also present itself with something in nature if the wind is blowing, seascapes with waves breaking, etc.
    I voted never. I do rarely take a second exposure if things change like in the above examples, or if the clouds change dramatically, or if fog rolls in, or if the sun comes out, or if 6 wild swans meander into my composition 30 feet from the camera (really happened), or if I think there was camera shake due to wind. These wouldn't really be duplicates, but different images of the same scene.

    While hiking I usually follow the trail for a bit, then take big arching loops off into the forest before coming back to the trail. Since I have only 6 film holders, I'd be out of film in no time. That and using a changing bag in the rain while being eaten alive by bugs isn't worth the peace of mind a second negative would give anyways.

    Murray

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