Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,663   Posts: 1,481,648   Online: 809
      
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    174
    I have a F1 with an upgraded front standard to F2 with a rail extension, lens boards, fresnel screen etc. If you are interested email me.

    Oh and they weigh about 10# so you can figure out the rest from there.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Fond du Lac, Wisconsin
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,065
    Images
    39
    About 10 years ago, I had a Sinar P 4x5. This is about the same size as the F models, but it's much heavier. Anyway, I built a box that would hold the camera hanging from the rail. I would than strap this wooden box onto a back pack frame, and off I'd go. You can buy cases that hold the camera in a similar way, but they are a little pricey. I built my box with 1/4 inch plywood, fiberglass cloth and epoxy. It's waterproof, rigid, fairly light, and it doesn't scream "Please steal the very expensive photo equipment."

  3. #13
    Struan Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Lund, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    914
    It's worth mentioning - gently - that most LF photographers are unfit middle-aged men, and that tends to skew the definition of 'portable'. My take is that if you can manage an overnight backpacking rucksack, with shared tent, cooking equipment, food and water, you will have no problems whatsoever with a monorail camera on day hikes. If you can manage a MF outfit in a shoulder bag, an LF kit in a rucksack will not present any difficulties in terms of pure transport.

    I use a Sinar Norma in the field. It's bulky, but the weight is no so very great and I value the versatility and the easy use of long lenses. For me, the best thing about the Sinars is their ability to compress down onto a single six-inch rail. The camera becomes a compact brick that can easily be stowed away and carried. Some of the cheap monorail options have rather long minimum rail lengths, which makes field use much more awkward. Even so, if you are working a few hundred yards from a car, even these are not that hard to carry.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Israel
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    365
    Quote Originally Posted by Struan Gray
    It's worth mentioning - gently - that most LF photographers are unfit middle-aged men, and that tends to skew the definition of 'portable'. My take is that if you can manage an overnight backpacking rucksack, with shared tent, cooking equipment, food and water, you will have no problems whatsoever with a monorail camera on day hikes. If you can manage a MF outfit in a shoulder bag, an LF kit in a rucksack will not present any difficulties in terms of pure transport.

    I use a Sinar Norma in the field. It's bulky, but the weight is no so very great and I value the versatility and the easy use of long lenses. For me, the best thing about the Sinars is their ability to compress down onto a single six-inch rail. The camera becomes a compact brick that can easily be stowed away and carried. Some of the cheap monorail options have rather long minimum rail lengths, which makes field use much more awkward. Even so, if you are working a few hundred yards from a car, even these are not that hard to carry.

    Thank you very much Stuan. Your point is very important and by far one of the most valuable to consider.
    In fact, I'm probably one of the yongest getting into LF - I'm 33. Although not a big guy (only 1.65m tall) I cannot lament on my physical condition (thanks to God) and I'm thankful to my former army training that taught me to love to get through even tough physical load if the result promises to be fruitful. I don't mind lugging my LawePro backpack full with professional 35mm setup weighting in total over 12 kg (approx 25 lb) for a day-long hikes including travels abroad if I anticipate bringing back home a worthy selection of slides. Physical load isn't usually contraint me unless it is really unreasonable and unmanageable. What would bother me however is if the LF setup will not fit into backpack dimension-wise (including all necessary accessories and 1-3 lenses) cause I hate to lug multiple bags (easy to forget, lose or get stolen).
    BTW, you mentioned yuo SInar has only 6-inch ling rail. Does that mean that the rail is that short because of being telescopic (or can be easily disassambled into two pieces) or you only shoot wide angle (no long rail is required) ? As far as I realize, regular portable monorails are featured by about 18" long rails at least (such as Linhof Colro Kardan 45s, for instance).

    Alex

  5. #15
    Struan Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Lund, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    914
    Sinar rails are infinitely extendable. A standard camera comes with a 12" 'base' (30 cm) rail, and that can be added to with extensions that come in 6", 12" and 18" lengths.

    I tend to backpack with the camera compressed down onto a 6" extension rail, and carry the 12" base rail in my pack. The 6" allows me to use my 90 mm and 150 mm lenses, and I add the extension if I want to do close ups or when I want to use my 240 mm and 465 mm lenses. I have an 18" rail too, but leave it at home as I would only need it for close-ups with the 465 mm lens and those are rare indeed.

    Everything I need to use the camera with one lens, including the base rail, dark cloth, meter, toolkit, loupe, film, LEE filter kit and lensshade, and a bag bellows fits into a Samsonite shoulder bag. That gets dropped into the top of my rucksack. Underneath goes a padded bag with the other lenses, and I sometimes have another padded bag with a Sinar shutter and other lensboard-sized accessories in it. Tripod goes on the ski-straps at the side of the pack, with head and rail-clamp attached.

    It would all fit in an 'alpine' day pack of 45-50 liters, but the one I have is deeply waisted and the Samsonite won't quite fit. I like having it so I can dump the main pack and go boulder hopping with a complete camera outfit, so I just use my bigger 80 liter pack. I have never weighed it, but even with water, foul weather clothes and lunch I don't feel like I'm backpacking.

    I have experimented with various forms of packing, and the length of the rail tended to dictate everything else. A extendable or folding rail helps a lot. I tried the standards-parallel-to-the-rail trick, but it doesn't really work on a Norma, and in any case, the resulting package is much more delicate and extended than my compact brick. YMMV of course.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Israel
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    365
    Thanks Straun. Well, frankly, few pictures worth throusands of words.. :-))
    I would love to see how it packs down that way, to bad hasn't find such kind fo picturs online so far...

  7. #17
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,079
    Images
    20
    If I wasn't 5000 miles away from my Sinar F and digital camera, I'd snap a picture for you. Just imagine the camera compressed as it would be with a short lens, but with a short rail underneath. You can leave the tripod base on the tripod to save bulk in your pack, and snap the rail in and out of it, quick-release style.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Israel
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    365
    Thanks David.
    Does that mean you don't get the bellows off and swing the the standards in parallel with the rail for packing into the bag ? (aka Linhof Color Kardan 45s - style) ?

  9. #19
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,079
    Images
    20
    You can do it either way, depending on what's convenient for your particular bag.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  10. #20
    Struan Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Lund, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    914
    Sorry Alexz, I thought I was going to be able to snap a couple of pics of my Sinar, but real life has intruded on my surfing to a disgusting extent recently. I'll try to get round to it, but no promises for a week or so.

    There are three ways of folding an F-model Sinar. One is to compress everything onto a six-inch rail, as I do, giving a brick that is roughly 18x20x30 cm in size. The second is to remove the bellows and turn the standards parallel to the rail, producing a flat-pack that is 40x30x5 cm. The third is to unhoook the bellows from one standard, fold it down onto the rail, apply a little rise to the second standard and fold it down on top of the first. This gives a thicker, slightly shorter flat-pack, but is faster to set up and you don't need to find a place to put the bellows.

    The third option requires that rise be below tilt, so it won't work on all monorails. The second requires 90 degrees of swing on both standards, so ditto. I find the first easy, simple and more compatible with life in a rucksack, but in the end it's a matter of taste.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin