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  1. #11
    BradS's Avatar
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    I don't know. I think it all depends on what you're trying to accomplish. The one major difference between LF and say, MF is that for LF, the focal length is generally going to be longer than that used on MF and, of course, longer focal length means less DOF. Perhaps, this is why so many LF landscape photos are done at relatively smaller aperatures.

    I prefer to shoot "people pictures" and so, have no aversion to more moderate apperatures - f/8 and f/11 are the norm. I occasionally even shoot wide open. In fact, the three LF photos posted in my gallery right now were done at just those aperatures...

    I think it just depends.
    Last edited by BradS; 08-11-2005 at 02:26 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BradS
    I don't know. I think it all depends on what you're trying to accomplish. The one major difference between LF and say, MF is that for LF, the focal length is generally going to be longer that that used on MF and of course, longer focal length means less DOF. Perhaps, this is why so many LF landscape photos are done at relatively smaller aperatures.
    ... I think it just depends.
    It does indeed depend, as you see there is quite a spread of working technique, particularly regarding film speed. Some people love slow films. I personally like Ilford HP5+ in 120 and all sheet film sizes, apart from anything else it gives you relatively short exposures in dim light, whereas slow film can end up needing an enormous exposure due to reciprocity law failure and then also pull development to compensate for the contrast rise. Conversely, fast film allows a higher speed in wind or other adverse conditions and allows some chance of a handheld exposure if necessary (I frequently use Speed Graphics out of doors).
    One point about the working aperture: View camera lenses are made to give best performance (sharpness and size of image circle) at about f16 to f22. Any aperture smaller than this will give more depth of field but almost certainly worse sharpness. As Donald Miller notes, effective depth of field can be increased through the use of camera movements - this means, for example, that it is possible with LF to use a telephoto lens and with quite a small amount of forward tilt to get deep focus (depth of field) from the front to the back of the picture. As Ole then says, the downside can be that a large-aperture telephoto lens will almost certainly be mounted in a large shutter, which may have limited shutter speeds - for example, I have a 500 mm f9 telephoto in a Copal 1 shutter (up to 1/400), and a 360 mm f5.5 telephoto in a Compound 3 shutter. which only goes up to 1/100.

  3. #13

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    I shoot Velvia 50 at the ends of the day most often. My shutter speeds are usually 1/4s to 40s, mostly in the 1 to 5 seconds range.

    A little movement in an otherwise sharp shot adds some flavour to the image - don't fight it.

    Cheers,
    Graeme Hird
    www.scenebyhird.com

    Failure is NOT an option! It comes bundled with your software ....

  4. #14
    roteague's Avatar
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    I find a lot of times, I want the movement; it gives my images a sense of "life". More so, since I shoot near the ocean a lot.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #15
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    One of the tricks of the 'old timers' was to shoot multiple exposures of blowing grass.

    Since grass tends to come back to the same place, you can build up an adequate exposure by closing the shutter when the wind starts to blow....
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

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