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  1. #1
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    Seeking Changing Bag Solutions for big pinhole cam

    Hi All; I just 'built' an 8x20 negative size panattone tin pinhole camera that I love and want to use on the road. Is anyone aware of anything out there that I could use to take paper out of the box and load it in my camera? The tin/camera is approx 9" tall and 12" in diameter/deep and my Agfa box is 16 x 20. I am open to process improvement ideas as well. Thanks in advance for all of the information and help I am sure to receive.
    All my Best;
    Victor

  2. #2
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    You need to cut 16x20 to 8x20 as well, right? Probably the first thing to do is borrow or rent a darkroom and cut all the paper you plan to use for this camera (the whole box, if you don't expect to enlarge that big from other sources -- you'll need paper to make prints from the negatives, too). With paper, you can do this under safelight conditions and actually see what you're doing.

    With the paper pre-cut, you *might* be able to put the can on top of the box, close the bag, open and slide back the paper box lid just far enough to manipulate the paper out of the inner bag, close the box, work the paper into the can, and work the lid on. I'm not certain, however, on that. You'll need the largest size changing bag (about 27x30 inches, IIRC), or one of the "changing tent" or "dark box" setups (look at the local mini-lab to see a largish dark box -- they use them for loading rolls of paper into the magazine for their printing machines). Alternately, many folks find they can make a closet dark enough, especially for relatively slow paper; you'd go into the closet with your stuff, close the door, and do your changing.

    Of course, then there's the issue of how you'll develop the negatives. Liquids inside a changing bag are a Very Bad Idea. Unless you're using the camera as a processing drum, you really, really need a darkroom (or else you're going to need 20 inches of 3" ABS pipe, a pair of caps, and the bits to put a light trap filler into one cap).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #3
    glbeas's Avatar
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    You might sacrifice a changing bag and permanently mount it to the camera so the door or hatch to access the film is inside. That should leave room enough for the box of film and be able to open the door with the bag closed. All this would depend on how the camera is constructed. I've seen a few small copy cameras built like this though they had a processor mounted to the top of the camera too.
    Gary Beasley

  4. #4
    Jersey Vic's Avatar
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    These are both very good ideas and I thank you. Just to clarify, I do have a small darkroom at home and can pre-cut my paper but I was at a loss as to what to do when I'm outdoors and away from home.
    When I am there I tray develop using 11x14 trays, alot of elbow grease and a kodak tray siphon to wash. So far, so good.



 

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